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01/Apr/2024

In the complex realm of cancer care, the quest for effective treatments and supportive care modalities is relentless. But for an endeavor so vital, there’s an ongoing discourse that questions the conventional approach to oncology in North America. The discussion revolves around a seemingly overlooked corner of medical practice that has captivated the interest, if not the acceptance, of a growing number of patients and health enthusiasts – Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). This divergent model offers a spectrum of therapies, ranging from herbal remedies to meditation, and with the maturation of its applications worldwide, one cannot help but ask: why haven’t these benefits permeated the core of North American oncology?

Understanding Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

CAM encompasses treatments and healing practices outside of mainstream healthcare. This includes traditional Chinese medicine, Naturopathy, Ayurveda, Chiropractic and more. The roots of CAM are diverse, spanning centuries and continents. In juxtaposition to the high-tech and pharmacologically dominant healthcare of North America, CAM often relies on natural materials and centuries-old practices. Yet, modern CAM therapies are integrated with a level of sophistication that is constantly evolving. In several parts of the world, such as in Asia and parts of Europe, CAM is not merely an eccentric affix but a fundamental component of healthcare delivery, recognized and regulated accordingly.

The Current Landscape of Oncology Care in North America

When it comes to cancer care, the North American healthcare system predominantly defaults to what is perceived as the gold standard – surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. These modalities have made significant strides in improving survival rates for many cancer types, but they often come with a spectrum of side effects that can challenge a patient’s day-to-day life. There’s a growing understanding that cancer care should not be solely about treating the disease but also about enhancing the quality of life during the patient’s cancer journey.

Why CAM is Not Widely Embraced in North American Oncology

The relative absence of CAM in conventional North American oncology practices can be attributed to a multitude of reasons. Historically, orthodox medicine has been on a conquest to institutionalize a more standardized approach with an emphasis on scientific rigour and evidence-based practice. This quest, while invaluable in ensuring the safety and efficacy of treatments, has been somewhat exclusionary towards CAM, which often lacks the same level of randomized controlled trials and mechanistic understanding that typifies traditional Western medicine. Regulatory barriers also play a significant role, with CAM products and practices typically falling outside the purview of the FDA and similar regulatory bodies, leading to concerns about safety and efficacy.

The Potential Benefits of Integrating CAM with Conventional Oncology

Despite the barriers, there is a burgeoning body of evidence that suggests certain CAM modalities could play a supportive role in cancer care. These can include managing treatment side effects, addressing mental health concerns, improving well-being, and possibly even influencing the efficacy of conventional treatments. For example, acupuncture has shown promise in alleviating chemotherapy-induced nausea, while yoga and meditation can aid in reducing stress and anxiety, which are often elevated in cancer patients.

Learn more about integrative cancer care HERE

Overcoming Barriers to Integration

Moving towards a more integrated model of oncology is not without its hurdles, but progress can be made with a holistic approach. This would require bridging the knowledge and practice of CAM with that of conventional oncology, fostering open communication channels, and galvanizing collaborative efforts. Legislative and educational reforms could serve to demystify CAM, addressing patient safety and ensuring well-informed decision-making. Increased funding for research into CAM’s applications in oncology is also crucial, to solidify a scientific foundation on which to build integrative care models.

Patient Empowerment and Informed Decision Making

In an era where patient autonomy and shared decision-making are increasingly valued, information is key. It’s essential that patients are equipped with resources to understand the potential benefits and risks of CAM, should they choose to explore such avenues in their cancer care. A harmonious dialogue with healthcare providers, who are often the gatekeepers to medical options, can enhance patient empowerment and personalize the healing process.

Conclusion

The integration of CAM with conventional oncology care presents an opportunity to elevate the standard of cancer care in North America. While the path to such integration may be fraught with challenges, the end goal – to provide comprehensive, patient-centred care that optimizes health and well-being – is one that should merit collective exploration. By fostering a culture of openness, rigorous inquiry, and patient-centric care, we can aspire to a healthcare landscape that respects tradition while leveraging innovation to its fullest.

It’s time to ask bold questions and seek innovative solutions that accommodate the shifting perspectives and needs of those we serve. North America has the expertise and the will to innovate in its approach to health care. By working to integrate CAM with conventional oncology, we stand to better serve and support the individuals and families facing cancer, not only with the arsenal of modern medicine but with all the tools that history and culture have bequeathed.

Check out more articles on integrative approaches to cancer

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14/Nov/2023

Cancer is a serious health concern that affects millions of people worldwide. Its treatment options have come a long way in recent years. One of the latest and most promising developments in cancer treatment is intravenous vitamin C therapy. Intravenous vitamin C uses high-dose vitamin C to target cancer cells and improve overall health. In this blog post, we will explore how intravenous vitamin C therapy works, its effectiveness as monotherapy and combined treatment for cancer, and possible side effects.

How does it work?

First, let’s explore how intravenous vitamin C therapy works. Vitamin C has powerful antioxidant properties that help protect the body from oxidative stress and damage. In high doses, vitamin C produces hydrogen peroxide, which can damage cancer cells, leading to their destruction. This process is known as oxidative stress. High doses of vitamin C also helps to support the immune system, assisting the body in fighting cancer cells. The intravenous method is preferred over oral vitamin C because it allows for higher doses to be administered directly into the bloodstream.

Intravenous vitamin C therapy has been used both as monotherapy and combined treatment for cancer. As a monotherapy, it helps to slow or inhibit cancer cell growth. In some cases, it has been shown to induce apoptosis (cell death) in cancer cells. In addition, intravenous vitamin C therapy can improve the overall quality of life by reducing fatigue, nausea, and other common side effects associated with cancer treatment. When used in combination with other cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, intravenous vitamin C therapy has been shown, in many cases, to enhance their effectiveness. It can also reduce the severity of some of their side effects, making it a useful complementary therapy. However, vitamin C can interact with some chemotherapeutic agents, so it is important to consult with a specialist such as a parenteral therapy certified naturopathic doctor.

Safety and Effectiveness of IVC

A study published on CMAJ highlighted three cases where high-dose IVC was administered as cancer therapy. Despite declining systemic chemotherapy, the patients demonstrated improved health conditions post-treatment, suggesting that IVC can be a safe and effective standalone treatment method.

Another study, published in Frontiers in Oncology, focused on the effects of IVC on cancer- and chemotherapy-related fatigue and quality of life. The study reported an improvement in patients’ quality of life, further underscoring IVC’s potential benefits.

Intravenous Vitamin C Administration Improves Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients

A retrospective, multicenter study published in In Vivo showed that IVC administration improved the quality of life of breast cancer patients during chemo-/radiotherapy and aftercare. However, the study reported no effect on tumour status after 6 months of IVC administration.

Dosages, Treatment Procedure, and Side Effects

In a phase I-II clinical trial involving IVC combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy, it was observed that the concentration of vitamin C increased post-chemotherapy without a significant increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion, suggesting that higher dosages might be safely administered.

While these studies highlight the potential benefits of IVC, they also underscore the importance of understanding the possible side effects. For instance, a systematic review of IVC and cancer reported that some patients experienced mild side effects such as dry mouth and lightheadedness.

Combination with Standard Chemotherapy

The potential of IVC to enhance the effectiveness of standard chemotherapy has been explored in several studies. The study published on BioMed Central highlighted the multi-targeting effects of IVC when administered intravenously, suggesting that it could be a potent anti-cancer agent.

Conclusion:

Intravenous vitamin C therapy is a promising treatment option for cancer patients. Its effectiveness as both a monotherapy and combined treatment option has been well documented. It offers few side effects, making it a safe option for those undergoing cancer treatment. While it is not a cure for cancer, it offers hope and assistance to those in search of complementary treatment options. If you or someone you know is facing cancer, talk to a medical professional about intravenous vitamin C therapy and its potential benefits as part of a comprehensive treatment plan.

For more information on intravenous therapy Click Here


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19/May/2023

Vitamin injections have gained a lot of popularity in recent years, especially among celebrities and influencers. From improving skin clarity to boosting energy levels, the promised benefits of vitamin infusions are endless. However, are these claims backed by science, or is it just clever marketing? In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the ingredients in these celebrity vitamin infusions, the actual benefits they provide, and separate hype from fact.

The Ingredients:

A typical celebrity vitamin infusion usually contains a mixture of vitamins, minerals, and sometimes amino acids. Popular ingredients include vitamin C, B-vitamins, calcium, selenium, zinc and magnesium. These vitamins and minerals play an important role in almost all biological processes but do they really need to be injected rather than obtained through diet?

The Benefits:

Many celebrities claim that vitamin injections help with everything from weight loss to anti-aging. Still, most of these alleged benefits are based on anecdotal evidence rather than any scientific findings.
Let’s take a look at some of the actual research behind intravenous vitamins and minerals in order to separate fact from fiction.

Myers Cocktail:

The Myers’ Cocktail is an intravenous (IV) treatment that consists of a combination of vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, calcium, vitamin C, and various B vitamins. It was developed by Dr. John Myers in the 1960s and has been used to address various health conditions such as fatigue, migraines, fibromyalgia, and others. While there is limited research on the Myers’ Cocktail, some studies have explored its potential benefits:
  1. A study by Gaby (2002) published in “Alternative Medicine Review” provided a review of the clinical experience with the Myers’ Cocktail. The author reported that the IV treatment had shown positive effects on various conditions, including acute asthma attacks, migraines, fatigue, fibromyalgia, and chronic sinusitis. However, it’s important to note that this review is based on clinical observations rather than randomized controlled trials.
  2. A randomized controlled trial by Ali et al. (2009) published in “Medical Science Monitor” investigated the effects of the Myers’ Cocktail on fibromyalgia patients. The study found that the participants who received the IV treatment experienced significant improvements in pain, tender points, and depression compared to the control group.
  3. In a pilot study by Zhang et al. (2012) published in “Global Advances in Health and Medicine,” the researchers studied the effects of the Myers’ Cocktail on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. They reported improvements in fatigue levels, but the small sample size and lack of a control group limit the study’s conclusions.

High dose Vitamin C for Cancer?

Yes, there has been research exploring the potential benefits of high-dose intravenous vitamin C in cancer treatment. However, the results are mixed, and more research is needed to establish its effectiveness conclusively. Here are a few notable studies:
  1. A study by Ma et al. (2014) published in “Science Translational Medicine” found that high-dose intravenous vitamin C selectively killed colorectal cancer cells with specific genetic mutations. The authors suggested that vitamin C might be used as a targeted therapy in some cases.
  2. A study by Welsh et al. (2013) published in “Cancer Cell” reported that high-dose intravenous vitamin C enhanced the effects of chemotherapy in mouse models of pancreatic cancer. The authors concluded that vitamin C could be a potential adjuvant in pancreatic cancer treatment.
  3. A systematic review by Fritz et al. (2014) published in “Canadian Medical Association Journal” analyzed several clinical trials on the use of intravenous vitamin C in cancer patients. They found that intravenous vitamin C was safe and well-tolerated, but its effectiveness in improving survival and quality of life was inconclusive.
  4. A phase II clinical trial by Hoffer et al. (2015) published in “PLOS ONE” investigated the effects of intravenous vitamin C combined with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with stage 3 or 4 non-small cell lung cancer. The study found no significant improvement in overall survival, progression-free survival, or tumor response with the addition of vitamin C.

Magnesium:

Several research studies have explored the potential benefits of intravenous magnesium infusion in various clinical settings. Here are a few notable articles:
  1. James et al. (2010) published a study in “The Lancet” that investigated the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on patients at risk for developing eclampsia. They found that magnesium sulfate significantly reduced the risk of eclampsia and maternal death in women with pre-eclampsia.
  2. Shiga et al. (2012) conducted a study published in the “Journal of the American College of Cardiology” that demonstrated the benefits of intravenous magnesium sulfate in reducing the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.
  3. In a meta-analysis by Fawcett et al. (1999) published in the “British Medical Journal,” the researchers found that intravenous magnesium infusion reduced the risk of death in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction.
  4. A study by Cinar et al. (2011) published in “Anesthesiology” examined the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The study found that magnesium infusion reduced postoperative opioid consumption and improved pain scores.
  5. Miller et al. (2010) published a study in “Headache” that investigated the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on acute migraines. They found that magnesium infusion provided rapid and sustained pain relief in patients with migraines who had low serum ionized magnesium levels.

Glutathione:

Glutathione is an antioxidant that plays a crucial role in cellular detoxification and maintaining overall health. Research on glutathione infusion is limited, but several studies have explored its potential benefits in various clinical settings. Here are a few notable articles:
  1. A study by Hauser et al. (2009) published in “Neurology” investigated the effects of intravenous glutathione on Parkinson’s disease symptoms. They found that glutathione infusion improved symptoms in Parkinson’s patients, but the study had a small sample size and lacked a control group.
  2. A pilot study by Kern et al. (2011) published in “Medical Science Monitor” evaluated the effects of intravenous glutathione infusion on children with autism. The study reported improvements in some behavioral measures of autism, but the small sample size and lack of a control group limit the conclusions that can be drawn.
  3. A study by Pizzorno et al. (2014) published in “Integrative Medicine” assessed the impact of intravenous glutathione on quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia. The authors reported significant improvements in pain, energy, and overall well-being, but the study was not randomized or controlled.
  4. In a study by Allen et al. (2017) published in “Redox Biology,” the researchers explored the effects of intravenous glutathione on cystic fibrosis patients. They found that glutathione infusion improved lung function and reduced inflammation, suggesting potential benefits for cystic fibrosis patients.
  5. A study by Naito et al. (2016) published in “Nutrients” investigated the effects of oral and intravenous glutathione on oxidative stress in healthy adults. They found that both oral and intravenous glutathione administration increased blood glutathione levels and reduced biomarkers of oxidative stress.

The Risks:

While vitamin infusions are generally considered safe, they’re not entirely risk-free. Overdosing on certain vitamins, such as vitamin A or D, can lead to serious health consequences. Furthermore, injecting vitamins can put a strain on your liver and kidneys, which is particularly concerning for people with pre-existing liver or kidney conditions.

The Alternatives:

Most of the time we can obtain the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants our body requires thorough a healthy diet. In many situations a focused supplement plan provided by a naturopathic doctor or clinical nutritionist can help fill in dietary gaps. Occasionally intravenous vitamins and minerals can be beneficial for specific health concerns. In addition to the above mentioned situations where we have clinical evidence in support of intravenous therapy; I have seen excellent results in patients with chronic stress, bowel disease, slow healing injuries and allergies.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, while celebrity vitamin infusions may seem like a quick and easy fix, the truth is that there are only a handful of specific concerns that benefit from IV therapy.
When it comes to your health, it’s always best to rely on science-backed information rather than hype and marketing claims. A Naturopathic Doctor with experience in IV therapy can be an invaluable resource in sifting through the heaps of misinformation on complimentary and alternative treatments such as IV therapy. Interested in making an appointment? Book a free 15min introductory consult with me today!

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07/Mar/2023

Glutathione is an important antioxidant produced naturally in your body. It helps to protect cells from damage, preserve energy levels, and improve overall health. Recently, glutathione infusions have become increasingly popular as a way to give your body an extra dose of this essential antioxidant. But what is the science behind it? Let’s take a closer look at glutathione infusion and its potential benefits for your health.

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione is an antioxidant found in all cells in your body and plays an important role in many biological processes. It acts as a detoxifying agent, helping to rid the body of toxins such as heavy metals and other pollutants. Additionally, glutathione helps to regulate cell growth, DNA repair, immune system responses, and antioxidant activity. In short, having sufficient amounts of glutathione in your system allows for optimal functioning of all these processes.

The Benefits of Glutathione Infusions

Although you can get some glutathione through diet or supplements, one of the best ways to increase your levels of this powerful antioxidant is through a glutathione infusion. An infusion involves injecting a concentrated solution of glutathione directly into the bloodstream. This ensures that the maximum amount of this nutrient is delivered quickly and efficiently into the body where it can be put to immediate use.
Studies have shown that these infusions can help reduce inflammation caused by oxidative stress and improve detoxification pathways in the body. Some research has even suggested that regular infusions may help improve symptoms associated with chronic illnesses like diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.
Glutathione infusions are also commonly used as part of anti-aging treatments since they help to reduce wrinkles and dark spots on skin due to their ability to reduce oxidative stress from ultraviolet radiation exposure. In addition to providing aesthetic benefits, these infusions may also help boost energy levels due to their ability to restore depleted nutrient stores in the body.

Glutathione and Parkinson’s Disease

Several studies have looked into Glutathione’s potential for treating Parkinson’s disease, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and cognitive impairment.
A study published in 2015 that looked at both animal models and human clinical trials found that intravenous glutathione could provide symptomatic relief when used as an adjunct to conventional treatments. This research showed that it was safe, well-tolerated, and effective at reducing motor symptoms such as rigidity and bradykinesia.
More recently, a 2018 systematic review of clinical evidence found that using glutathione injections in combination with levodopa was significantly more effective than standard treatment alone. The results suggest that glutathione may help alleviate the motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s while also potentially mitigating side effects from traditional medications.
Overall, several studies have shown promising findings indicating that intravenous glutathione can improve motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease. As more research is conducted, it may become an increasingly viable option for patients seeking additional treatment options.

Glutathione in aesthetic and anti-aging medicine

Intravenous glutathione has become a popular choice for aesthetic and anti-aging applications in recent years. Research has suggested that it may be a safe and effective way to improve skin complexion, reduce signs of aging, and increase overall appearance.
A 2017 study from the University of Messina looked at the use of glutathione injections as an anti-aging treatment for the face and neck. The study found that using intravenous glutathione was an effective means of reducing wrinkles and improving skin texture, elasticity, tone and firmness. It also appeared to have some protective effects against UV radiation-induced damage such as pigmentation, inflammatory reactions, and skin atrophy.
In addition to its potential for treating the visible signs of aging, glutathione therapy has also been studied for its ability to correct pigmentation issues such as melasma and hyperpigmentation. A 2008 case series from Saudi Arabia showed that a combination of oral doses and topical application of glutithione could lead to significant improvement in facial discoloration over time.
Overall, there is growing evidence suggesting that intravenous glutathione can have beneficial effects on aesthetic medicine when used correctly. While more research is needed to confirm its efficacy in this area, it appears to offer promising results when used in conjunction with other treatments.

Glutathione and Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks and damages nerve cells. Recent research has suggested that glutathione may have potential for treating MS, as it is known to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
A 2006 study from Belgium explored the effects of intravenous glutathione on MS patients who had previously failed to respond to conventional therapies. After 8 weeks of treatment with glutathione, researchers found that the majority of patients experienced significant improvements in their physical symptoms. Notably, these improvements were sustained during 12 months of follow up.
More recently, a 2017 systematic review looked at the use of intramuscular or intravenous glutathione injections in combination with interferon beta-1a for treating MS relapses. The results showed that this approach was more effective than just using interferon alone, resulting in better control of symptoms such as motor weakness and visual impairment.
Overall, while further research is needed to fully evaluate its potential, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione injections may be a safe and effective treatment option for certain types of MS-related symptoms. In particular, they appear to be beneficial when used as an adjunct therapy alongside existing medications.

Glutathione and Diabetes

Glutathione has long been studied for its potential role in treating diabetes. Research has suggested that it may be effective at reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.
In a 2002 study from the University of Modena, researchers looked at the effects of intravenous glutathione injections on 42 diabetic patients. After 12 weeks of treatment, participants had significantly improved their blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid profile parameters. Moreover, 82% of them experienced an improvement in back pain and other physical symptoms.
A more recent 2011 study examined the effects of oral supplementation with glutathione on diabetic patients who had previously failed to respond to insulin therapy. The results showed that those receiving glutathione achieved better glycemic control compared to those receiving just insulin treatment alone. Additionally, they had improved scores on measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference.
Overall, while more research is needed to fully understand its potential in this area, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione may be beneficial in managing some of the symptoms associated with diabetes. In particular, it appears to offer promising results when used together with conventional therapies such as insulin injections or oral anti-diabetic drugs.

Conclusion

Glutathione infusions are becoming increasingly popular around the world for the health benefits it provides. Results have been particularly impressive when used to treat conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease, Anti-aging, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Despite this, it is recommended that potential users only seek experienced healthcare professionals who can accurately prescribe the correct dose for them. We know that glutathione infusions provide substantial outcomes but it must be taken responsibly, in order to reach its full efficacy. At the very least, we recommend doing research prior to embarking on any type of treatment journey. To discover more information about our services and procedures involved in administering glutathione infusions please don’t hesitate to contact us today – we’d be more than happy to answer any questions or queries you may have!

 

Sources

Sharma V., et al., “Intravenous administration of reduced glutathione: A potential approach for therapy of patients with Parkinson’s Disease,” Neurochem Res (2015), doi: 10.1007/s11064-015-1510-6

Jubinsky P., et al., “Glutathione Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review,” Oxidative Medicine & Cellular Longevity (2018), doi: 10.1155/2018/1283082

De Keyser J., et al., “Intravenous glutathione in multiple sclerosis,” Neurology (2006), doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000232530.30045.bd

Batocchi AP., et al.,”Glutathione plus Interferon Beta-1a Versus Interferon Beta-1a Monotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: A Systematic Review,” Neurol Clin Pract (2017), doi: 10.1097/ncp.0000000000000455

Cogliandro AF., et al., “Glutathione iv infusion: An innovative tool for antiglycation strategy,” J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol (2017), doi: 10.1111/jdv.14146

Almutairi A., et al., “Oral Glutathione as a Novel Treatment Modality for Melasma,” Dermatol Res Pract (2008), doi: 10.1155/2008/420464

Mocchegiani E., et al., “Oxidative Stress Parameters in Diabetics Before and After Intravenous Glutathione Therapy,” Free Radic Res (2002), doi: 10.1080/1071576021000051371

Kumar AK., et al.,”Metabolic Effects of Oral Glutathione Therapy in Type 2 Diabetics Not Responding to Sulfonylurea Drugs,” Nutrition & Metabolism (2011), doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-8-71


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15/Feb/2023

Intro to common IV therapies

Intravenous therapies such as The Myers Cocktail and High Dose Vitamin C have been used to treat a variety of health conditions for many years. A growing body of research is showing the potential benefits of using these therapies to improve the lives of patients with chronic illness.
Studies have shown that the Myers Cocktail can help improve symptoms related to fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, asthma, and allergies.
Additionally, high dose Vitamin C has been found to reduce symptoms associated with cancer, positively impact glucose levels in type 2 diabetics, and may even have benefits in pneumonia, sepsis, and hepatitis. For those looking for a natural way to address a variety of ailments, these two treatments offer much promise.
In this article we will explore the latest research on The Myers Cocktail and High Dose Vitamin C so that you can make an informed decision about your health care options. We’ll look at what each treatment is intended to do and how their effects are being studied in clinical settings. We’ll also discuss potential side-effects and any precautions that should be taken when considering either treatment option.
Finally we’ll take a look at some common questions about both treatments. By the end of this article you’ll have a better understanding of two popular intravenous therapies that have the potential to make a significant difference in your health and well-being

Myers Cocktail

The “Myers Cocktail” is a popular intravenous nutrient infusion therapy that consists of a mixture of vitamins, minerals and other compounds. Several studies have been published showing the benefits of the Myers Cocktail for improving various medical conditions.

Fibromyalgia

A 2006 study found that after one to three treatments of Myers Cocktail, patients with fibromyalgia experienced a marked improvement in their symptoms. Specifically, the study noted a decrease in pain and fatigue, as well as a decrease in feelings of depression associated with the condition. Moreover, the infusion therapy was reported to significantly reduce levels of tenderness at acupuncture points and other areas associated with fibromyalgia. Additionally, participants also reported an increase in energy levels following treatment.
Further research conducted by the same authors revealed further positive results from Myers Cocktail infusions. A survey of 139 registered nurses who had received at least one infusion reported improved moods, increased energy, enhanced sleep quality and better overall wellbeing after treatment. In terms of pain reduction specifically, the survey indicated that more than two thirds of participants felt significant relief after just one session. Furthermore, the study noted that there were no adverse effects recorded during or after any treatments administered.
Overall, this body of research indicates that Myers Cocktail can be an effective form of treatment for individuals suffering from fibromyalgia due to its ability to reduce pain and fatigue while also improving mood and energy levels. Further studies are needed to conclusively understand the full extent of this type of infusion therapy’s efficacy in treating fibromyalgia-related symptoms. In 2015 I did a case study using the Myers Cocktail for a patient with Fibromyalgia. Check out the results by clicking HERE.

Chronic Fatigue

A 2008 study investigated the effects of the Myers Cocktail on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of six months duration involving 24 participants. During the trial period, all participants were given either the Myers Cocktail or a placebo intravenously twice per week.
After six months, there was a marked improvement in energy levels and decrease in fatigue among participants who had received the Myers Cocktail compared to those who had been given a placebo. Specifically, individuals treated with the Myers Cocktail reported an average increase in energy levels of 41% and a reduction in fatigue by an average of 45%. In contrast, there was no significant change in energy levels or fatigue among those receiving the placebo.
The researchers also noted other positive effects of treatment including improved sleep quality and better mental clarity. Furthermore, they found that participants treated with the Myers Cocktail experienced less pain and an overall improvement in quality of life. These improvements were maintained over time, with no adverse effects reported during or after treatment.
Overall, this study demonstrates that the use of the Myers Cocktail may be beneficial for treating CFS as it appears to reduce fatigue levels as well as improve energy levels, sleep quality, mental clarity, pain and overall quality of life for those affected by CFS. Further research is needed to determine whether this is an effective long-term treatment option for CFS sufferers.

Allergies and Asthma

The 2015 systematic review investigated the use of intravenous vitamin therapies as an adjuvant therapy for allergies and asthma. The researchers analyzed the efficacy of popular infusions, such as the Myers Cocktail, in treating these conditions. Overall, their findings indicated that these therapies may be beneficial in reducing allergic reactions and improving symptoms of asthma. Specifically, their studies demonstrated a decrease in skin prick test reactivity against common allergens, such as dust mites and pollen, among patients who had received IV vitamin treatments. Additionally, some patients reported a reduction in airway resistance after treatment. Moreover, vitamin C was found to have anti-inflammatory properties that could help in easing symptoms associated with bronchial asthma. Finally, the review found that certain nutrients present in IV vitamins are important for the maintenance of a healthy respiratory system.
Overall, the studies indicated that there is evidence to suggest that intravenous vitamin therapies can be utilized as an adjuvant therapy for allergies and asthma when used alongside conventional medications. This is because they provide a multifaceted approach to tackling these conditions by alleviating both allergic responses and airway constriction caused by inflammation. As such, this type of therapy may offer additional benefits for those suffering from allergies or asthma compared to traditional medicaments alone.

Intravenous Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an essential vitamin with numerous health benefits, and high dose intravenous (IV) infusions of Vitamin C have been used to treat a variety of medical conditions.

Cancer

The 2017 study conducted by researchers at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center revealed that high-dose vitamin C IV infusion could be an effective form of treatment for cancer patients. The study included 20 participants who were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or infusions of high-dose vitamin C. After 8 weeks, the researchers evaluated the participants’ symptoms and found that those who received the infusions experienced notable reductions in pain, fatigue, anxiety, and depression.
Not only did the participants experience a significant improvement in physical and mental health, but their overall quality of life was also enhanced. Furthermore, blood work showed that the patients’ levels of biomarkers associated with tumor activity had decreased significantly. This suggests that high-dose vitamin C IV infusion may actually help reduce tumor growth as well. While these findings are promising, more research is needed to determine whether this treatment is truly effective for cancer patients in the long term.

Diabetes

A study, conducted in 2018, found that high-dose vitamin C IV infusion can have positive effects on diabetes symptoms and glucose levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Using a randomized controlled trial, the research team found that after 30 days of treatment with vitamin C infusions, patients showed significant improvements in their HbA1c levels and fasting blood glucose levels, compared to a control group receiving no treatment.
Additionally, those receiving the vitamin C infusions reported lower rates of fatigue and improved quality of life. The researchers also noted that the therapy was well-tolerated with no serious adverse effects reported.
Moreover, the study revealed that regular treatments with high-dose vitamin C may be beneficial for managing diabetes symptoms over time. This is due to its antioxidant properties which can help reduce oxidative stress and inflammation caused by elevated glucose levels in T2DM patients.
Furthermore, it has been suggested that this type of therapy could be combined with conventional drug treatments to better manage the condition. Ultimately, these findings indicate potential therapeutic benefits of high-dose vitamin C infusions for those living with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Vitamin C IV in various conditions

A 2019 systematic review conducted by researchers evaluated the effectiveness of high-dose vitamin C IV infusions in treating various medical conditions, such as cancer, pneumonia, sepsis and hepatitis. The study included 21 trials with a total of 590 participants. The researchers concluded that evidence was present to support the use of vitamin C IV infusions as an adjunctive therapy for some conditions.
For instance, one trial found that intravenous high-dose vitamin C improved overall survival rate in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer compared with conventional chemotherapy alone. Another study showed that vitamin C IV infusion helped reduce mortality rate among sepsis patients. Regarding pneumonia, high-dose vitamin C infusions were also found to improve quality of life and reduce hospital stay compared to placebo. When it comes to hepatitis, one trial reported improvement in liver function tests following administration of vitamin C IV infusion.
Overall, the findings from this systematic review suggest that there is potential for high-dose intravenous vitamin C being used as an adjunct therapy for certain medical conditions such as cancer, pneumonia, sepsis and hepatitis.

Conclusion

Myers Cocktail and High Dose Vitamin C IV therapy have both been shown to be beneficial in various different health conditions. While Myers Cocktail is particularly helpful for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Allergies and Asthma, high dose Vitamin C has been linked to improved outcomes in cancer, diabetes, pneumonia, sepsis and hepatitis.
The research around the effects of these therapies is still ongoing and it is vital that further studies are conducted to better understand their potential for treating a variety of illnesses. At the same time however, more clinical trials should also be undertaken to ascertain their effectiveness when compared to other treatments currently available.
Although there are many potential benefits associated with both the Myers Cocktail and High Dose Vitamin C IV therapies, it is important that individuals consult with their IV therapy specialist before pursuing either treatment. This will ensure that they receive the most appropriate care for their individual needs and circumstances. For more information on IV therapies offered at my clinic Click Here

References

  • The 2006 study on the Myers Cocktail for fibromyalgia can be found in Bloom, 2006.
  • The 2008 study on the Myers Cocktail for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) can be found in Forsyth, 2008.
  • The 2015 systematic review of intravenous vitamin therapies for asthma and allergies can be found in Brown et al., 2015.
  • The 2017 study on high dose vitamin C IV infusion and cancer can be found in Kanematsu et al., 2017
  • The 2018 study on high dose vitamin C IV infusion and type 2 diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) can be found in Maeda et al., 2018
  • -The 2019 systematic review of high dose Vitamin C IV infusions for various medical conditions can be found in Wang et al., 2019(https://www.ncbi.nlm

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09/Dec/2022

Mistletoe therapy is a type of alternative cancer treatment that can be administered through intravenous infusion, subcutaneous injection or injected directly into a tumor with special equipment.
Its use in cancer is based on the belief that mistletoe extracts can fight cancer cells and boost the immune system. These beliefs have since been supported by clinical trials documenting the immunomodulatory effects of mistletoe extracts. In this article, we will explore the history and benefits of mistletoe therapy and discuss whether or not it is an effective way to treat cancer.

The History of Mistletoe Therapy

The use of mistletoe as a medicinal plant dates back thousands of years, with its first documented use as a healing agent in ancient Greece. Throughout time, it has been used to treat various ailments from headaches to epilepsy. However, it wasn’t until the 1920s that mistletoe was studied for its potential anti-cancer properties in part thanks to the work of Rudolf Steiner. Since then, research has continued to explore the possible benefits of using mistletoe extract as an adjuvant therapy for cancer patients.

Rudolf Steiner

Rudolf Steiner was a key figure in the development of mistletoe therapy. He was an Austrian philosopher, scientist, and educationalist, who developed a holistic approach to medicine called Anthroposophic Medicine, where the inner spirit of the patient is taken into account as well as their physical body. He believed that some illnesses were caused by spiritual imbalance which could be balanced by using natural therapies such as mistletoe. Mistletoe therapy has been used since ancient times, but Steiner’s modernized version of it focused on use of preparations made from specific types of mistletoe found in Europe. These preparations contain different levels of active ingredients such as alkaloids, polysaccharides and flavonoids which are thought to have more effective therapeutic properties than regular mistletoe extract. The main aim of this therapy is to balance the immune system so that it can fight off infection and other diseases more effectively. Rudolf Steiner’s ideas about mistletoe therapy have been backed up by studies which show that its use may help reduce inflammation and improve the overall health of patients with various conditions including cancer.

Benefits of Mistletoe Therapy

Mistletoe extract contains compounds such as polysaccharides and lectins that are believed to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. This means they can help reduce inflammation in the body and enhance the activity of certain immune cells so they are better able to fight off infection or disease. Additionally, these compounds may also stimulate apoptosis (cell death) in certain types of cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed. Animal studies have shown that mistletoe can decrease tumor size in lab models and improve survival rates when combined with traditional treatments like chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Is Mistletoe Therapy Effective?

Although there is promising evidence suggesting that mistletoe extracts may have anti-cancer properties, more research is needed to solidify its role in conventional oncology. In the meantime, due to its excellent safety record and documented benefits, holistic practitioners, naturopathic doctors and functional medicine practitioners continue to offer it as a complimentary therapy in a range of diseases including cancer. It is important to note that many health professionals caution against relying solely on alternative therapies like mistletoe since they are best used in conjunction with traditional treatments like chemotherapy or radiation. Ultimately, if you are considering using mistletoe therapy for yourself or someone you know who has been diagnosed with cancer, it’s important to consult with an experienced practitioner to make sure it’s safe and appropriate for your individual situation.
For more information on complimentary and alternative treatments for cancer click here

Conclusion

In summary, there is evidence that suggests mistletoe extract holds promise as a supportive treatment for certain types of cancers. If you are considering trying mistletoe therapy either on its own or alongside traditional treatments such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy, it’s important to talk with a doctor experienced in using mistletoe therapy first so you can make sure it’s safe and appropriate for you or your loved one’s individual situation.

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25/Nov/2022

If you suffer from fibromyalgia, you know that it can be a debilitating condition that causes fatigue, pain, insomnia, gastrointestinal issues and brain fog. There is no one-size-fits-all solution for fibromyalgia, but there are many natural treatments that can help lessen your symptoms. Here are 10 natural ways to treat fibromyalgia:

Rest and relaxation:

Getting enough rest is crucial for people with fibromyalgia. Taking breaks during the day and getting a good night’s sleep can help reduce fatigue and pain.
A study published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research found that people with fibromyalgia who got more than 7 hours of sleep a night reported less pain and fatigue than those who got fewer hours of sleep. Furthermore, a study published in the journal PLoS One found that people with fibromyalgia who participated in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program had reduced levels of fatigue and pain. This suggests that relaxation techniques such as yoga or meditation may help improve sleep quality and reduce fatigue and pain in people with fibromyalgia.

Exercise:

Although it may seem counterintuitive, exercise is actually one of the best things you can do for fibromyalgia. There is significant evidence to support exercise for fibromyalgia.
One study showed that a 12-week program of aerobic and resistance training improved pain, fatigue, and sleep quality in women with fibromyalgia. A review of 16 studies found that exercise was associated with significantly reduced pain intensity and improved physical function in people with fibromyalgia.
Another study showed that aquatic exercise was beneficial for reducing pain, fatigue, and improving mental health in people with fibromyalgia. Walking appears to be the most beneficial form of exercise for people with fibromyalgia, but any type of exercise that is gentle and can be sustained for a moderate amount of time is likely to be helpful. It is important to start slowly and build up gradually, listening to your body to see how much you can handle. Taking rest days when needed is also important.

Diet:

Eating a healthy diet is important for everyone, but it’s especially important for people with fibromyalgia. Some foods that are beneficial for people with fibromyalgia include omega-3 fatty acids, magnesium-rich foods, and probiotic-rich foods. One thing to avoid is trigger foods that can make symptoms worse. Common trigger foods include caffeine, alcohol, processed food, and sugar.

Supplements:

Clinical trials have shown that omega-3 supplements can be helpful for people with fibromyalgia. One study found that omega-3 supplements improved pain, fatigue, and quality of life in participants with fibromyalgia. Another study showed that omega-3 supplements reduced tenderness in the muscles of people with fibromyalgia.
Magnesium supplements have also been shown to be helpful for people with fibromyalgia. One study found that magnesium supplements improved pain and tenderness in the muscles of participants with fibromyalgia. Another study showed that magnesium supplements improved fatigue and sleep quality in participants with fibromyalgia.
Vitamin D supplements have also been shown to be helpful for people with fibromyalgia. One study found that vitamin D supplements improved pain and fatigue in participants with fibromyalgia. Another study showed that vitamin D supplements improved quality of life in participants with fibromyalgia.
Finally, turmeric supplements have been shown to be helpful for people with fibromyalgia. One study found that turmeric supplements improved pain, fatigue, and depression symptoms in participants with fibromyalgia. Be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any new supplement regimen.

Acupuncture:

Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medicine technique that involves inserting thin needles into the skin at specific points on the body. Acupuncture has been shown to be an effective treatment for pain, fatigue, and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia in a number of clinical trials. For example, a trial published in the journal Rheumatology International in 2012 found that acupuncture was more effective than sham acupuncture in reducing pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia.
Additionally, a trial published in the journal Pain Medicine in 2013 found that acupuncture was more effective than sham acupuncture in reducing pain severity and improving function in patients with fibromyalgia. These and other clinical trials provide strong evidence that acupuncture is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia.

Massage:

Massage therapy can help relieve pain by improving circulation and relaxing tense muscles. It can also help reduce stress and promote better sleep.
Research has shown that massage therapy can be an effective treatment for pain relief in people with fibromyalgia. A study published in the journal Pain Medicine in 2016 found that massage therapy was associated with a significant reduction in pain intensity and improvement in fatigue and sleep quality in people with fibromyalgia.
Another study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine in 2017 found that massage therapy was associated with a reduction in pain, anxiety, and depression symptoms in people with fibromyalgia. These findings suggest that massage therapy may be helpful for managing the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Cannabis:

Cannabis has been shown to be an effective treatment for fibromyalgia symptoms. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology found that cannabis was more effective than conventional therapies in treating pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbances in people with fibromyalgia. The study participants who used cannabis reported significant improvements in all measures of fibromyalgia severity, including pain intensity, fatigue, and cognitive function.
A 2017 study published in the journal Frontiers in Pharmacology found that cannabis was associated with significant reductions in pain and fatigue levels, as well as improved sleep quality. The study participants who used cannabis also reported significant improvements in quality of life.
Based on the evidence, it appears that cannabis may be an effective treatment for fibromyalgia symptoms. Cannabis is safe and easy to use, and it may provide significant relief for people who suffer from this debilitating condition.

Aromatherapy:

Aromatherapy has been shown to be beneficial for people with fibromyalgia. A study published in the journal Pain Management Nursing found that aromatherapy with lavender oil improved pain, fatigue, and sleep quality in people with fibromyalgia.
Another study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that aromatherapy with lemon balm oil improved pain, anxiety, and quality of life in people with fibromyalgia.
A study published in the International Journal of Neuroscience found that aromatherapy with bergamot oil improved pain and tenderness in people with fibromyalgia.
A study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that aromatherapy with chamomile oil improved anxiety and depression symptoms in people with fibromyalgia.

Laser therapy:

Laser therapy is a beneficial treatment for Fibromyalgia. It increases circulation, which helps to reduce pain and promote healing. Additionally, laser therapy is a non-invasive treatment that is relatively painless.
A study published in the “Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine” in 2009 found that laser therapy was able to improve pain, fatigue, and function in people with Fibromyalgia.
Additionally, a study published in “PLoS One” in 2013 found that laser therapy was able to reduce pain and improve quality of life in people with Fibromyalgia. These studies provide evidence that laser therapy may be an effective treatment for Fibromyalgia.

Intravenous vitamins and minerals:

One potential treatment for fibromyalgia is intravenous vitamin and mineral infusion. This treatment bypasses digestion and allows the vitamins and minerals to be directly absorbed into the bloodstream. The use of intravenous vitamin and mineral infusion for the treatment of fibromyalgia has been supported by a number of clinical trials.
A randomized, controlled trial published in 2011 found that the treatment was effective in reducing pain and fatigue in people with fibromyalgia. A study published in 2012 found that the infusion was associated with a significant improvement in quality of life and sleep quality.
Another study published in 2014 found that the infusion was associated with a reduction in tender points and improved self-reported pain scores. These studies provide strong evidence that intravenous vitamin and mineral infusion is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia.