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30/Jan/2024

When people think of vitamin C, the first thing that usually comes to mind is its ability to ward off the common cold. But did you know that vitamin C is also an incredibly powerful nutrient for recovery? That’s right! Vitamin C plays a crucial role in everything from wound healing to muscle repair, making it an essential component of any recovery plan. In this article, we’ll dive deeper into the benefits of vitamin C for recovery and explore some of the best sources of this vital nutrient.

Immune System Boost

Vitamin C plays an important role in supporting our immune system by increasing the production of white blood cells. This means that vitamin C can help to keep us healthy when we’re feeling under the weather. But did you know that vitamin C is also important for healing injuries? When the body is fighting off an illness or recovering from an injury, it needs more vitamin C than usual.

Check out the benefits of intravenous vitamin C therapy HERE

Wound Healing

If you have a cut or scrape, vitamin C can help to speed up the healing process. This is because it is essential for the production of collagen, which is a vital protein that helps to build connective tissue. Collagen plays a crucial role in the healing of wounds, making vitamin C an important nutrient for anyone who wants to recover quickly from an injury. This is also why vitamin C is a common ingredient in skin creams and other beauty products.

Muscle Repair

Whether you’re an avid gym-goer or just enjoy staying active, you know how important it is to take care of your muscles. Vitamin C can help with muscle repair by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. This means that vitamin C can help to protect your muscles from damage and can also speed up the recovery process if you experience any muscle soreness.

On a personal note, I have been using a whoop band for sleep and fitness tracking and was surprised to see a 6% increase in recovery correlated to my vitamin C consumption.

Check out this article on injury recovery HERE

Supplements for Rock Climbing

Best Sources of Vitamin C

So, where can you find vitamin C? The best sources are fruits and vegetables like oranges, kiwis, broccoli, bell peppers, and kale. It’s important to note that vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, which means that your body can’t store it. This is why it’s important to consume vitamin C-rich foods regularly. Vitamin C supplementation may also be a viable option for those not getting suffcient amounts through diet alone.

How Much Vitamin C Do You Need?

The recommended daily intake of vitamin C is 75 mg for women and 90 mg for men. However, these guidelines can vary depending on your age and activity level. If you’re recovering from an injury, you may need to consume more vitamin C to support your body’s healing process. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine the right amount of vitamin C for your needs. If supplementing with vitamin C for immune health or recovery, I recommend taking 500mg-1000mg several times per day.

Conclusion:

Overall, vitamin C is an underrated nutrient for recovery that should not be overlooked. From boosting the immune system to aiding in muscle repair, vitamin C is an essential component of any recovery plan. Make sure to consume vitamin C-rich foods regularly, especially if you’re recovering from an illness or injury. Incorporating more vitamin C into your diet is an easy way to support your body’s healing process and ensure that you’re feeling your best.


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04/Dec/2023

Have you ever seen those circular bruises on the back of athletes’ shoulders and wondered how they got there? Chances are, they’re the result of a practice known as cupping. Cupping therapy is an age-old form of alternative medicine, originating from ancient Chinese and Egyptian cultures. The practice involves creating suction on the skin using cups, which pulls the skin upwards and increases blood flow to the area. This is believed to help mobilize blood flow, promoting healing and relieving muscle tension.

There are various types of cupping therapy, each with its unique benefits and applications. In this article, we’ll delve into three main types: flame cupping, vacuum cupping, and sliding cupping. We’ll explore their characteristics, benefits, scientific research backing their effectiveness, and the potential risks involved.

Flame Cupping

Flame cupping, also known as fire cupping, is the traditional method of cupping therapy. It involves soaking a cotton ball in alcohol, setting it alight, and then placing it inside a glass cup. The fire consumes the oxygen inside the cup, creating a vacuum as it cools, which causes the cup to stick to the skin and draw it upwards.

Research suggests that flame cupping can assist in pain management, inflammation reduction, and promote relaxation. A study published in PLoS ONE found that patients with chronic neck pain reported significant pain relief after undergoing flame cupping therapy.

However, there are risks associated with flame cupping, including burns, skin infection, and temporary skin discolouration. Therefore, it’s crucial to have this procedure performed by a trained professional.

Naturopathic Pain Management Cupping

Vacuum Cupping

Vacuum cupping, also called mechanical or suction cupping, uses a hand-held pump to create the suction effect instead of heat. This method offers more control over the amount of suction and will avoid the potential to cause burns.

Research indicates that vacuum cupping can be beneficial for conditions like fibromyalgia and chronic back pain. A systematic review in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that vacuum cupping significantly reduced pain in people with fibromyalgia compared to no treatment.

While vacuum cupping is generally safer than flame cupping, potential side effects include bruising, discomfort during the procedure, and minor skin irritation.

Slide Cupping

Slide cupping, or moving cupping, involves applying oil to the skin, creating suction in the cup, and then sliding the cup around the affected area. This technique is often used for treating large muscle groups and is particularly popular among athletes for recovery.

A study in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine reported that slide cupping could improve range of motion and decrease perceived muscle soreness in athletes.

Slide cupping shares similar risks with the other types, including possible skin irritation and discolouration.

How it works

The primary goal of cupping therapy is to enhance circulation, help relieve pain, remove “heat,” and pull out the toxins that linger in your body’s tissues. It’s believed that the suction from the cups lifts the skin and underlying tissues, leading to increased blood and lymph flow. This fresh influx of blood nourishes and repairs the targeted area, promoting healing and relaxation.

From a scientific perspective, cupping therapy may improve blood flow, reduce inflammation, and activate the immune system. The vacuum created by the cup stimulates the nervous system, which can increase blood circulation and reduce pain.

Conditions

Several studies suggest that cupping therapy may be beneficial for a variety of health conditions:

  1. Chronic Pain: A systematic review of 135 studies found evidence that cupping therapy can effectively reduce chronic neck and lower back pain.
  2. Cardiovascular Diseases: Some researchers suggest that cupping could help manage cardiovascular diseases by improving blood flow. However, more research is needed in this area.
  3. Respiratory Diseases: Cupping is traditionally used in the treatment of respiratory diseases like the common cold, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Scientific evidence supporting this use is limited but growing.
  4. Skin Diseases: Anecdotal evidence suggests that cupping may help with acne, herpes zoster, and other skin diseases. More rigorous studies are needed to confirm these effects.

It’s worth noting that cupping has been associated with some risks, particularly when done without proper training or hygiene. The most common side effects include bruising, skin irritation, and mild discomfort. More serious complications, such as infections or bleeding, are relatively rare but can occur, particularly with wet cupping. Additionally, cupping is not recommended for everyone, particularly pregnant women, people with bleeding disorders, or people taking blood thinners.

Check out more Naturopathic solutions to chronic pain Here

Conclusion

Cupping is an ancient therapy that has been used for centuries to treat a variety of conditions, but it remains a relatively mysterious and controversial practice in the West. While cupping has been associated with some potential benefits, including pain relief, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms and effectiveness. Additionally, cupping does carry some risks, particularly when done without proper training or hygiene. If you’re considering cupping as a therapy, it’s important to do your research and work with a qualified practitioner to ensure safety and effectiveness.

For more information on Cupping Click Here

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12/Jul/2023

For many men and women, hair loss can be a source of insecurity and can negatively impact their self-esteem. This often leads them to seek treatment, with finasteride being one of the most common solutions to prevent further hair loss. However, despite its popularity, this medication can cause adverse effects, including sexual dysfunction and breast tenderness. But don’t worry, there are natural alternatives to finasteride to address hair loss. In this article, we will explore a few options that are safe, effective, and without the unwanted side effects.

1. Saw Palmetto:

Native to the Southeastern United States, saw palmetto is a plant extract that has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for male hair loss. It works by inhibiting the production of DHT, a male hormone that causes hair loss. Saw palmetto can be consumed in capsule form or applied to the scalp as an oil. In a study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, saw palmetto was found to be as effective as finasteride in improving hair growth.
The recommended dosage of saw palmetto for hair loss varies across different sources. According to a 2-year study, men with male pattern baldness were given 320 mg of saw palmetto per day. Some sources suggest a general recommended dosage between 160–320 milligrams daily.

2. Biotin:

Biotin, also known as vitamin H, is a B-complex vitamin that plays a critical role in healthy hair growth. It works by strengthening hair follicles and preventing hair breakage and damage. Biotin can be found in many foods, including eggs, nuts, and bananas, but it’s also available in supplement form. In a clinical trial published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, biotin was found to improve hair volume and thickness in women with hair loss.

3. Rosemary:

Rosemary is an herb that has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to prevent hair loss and promote hair growth. It’s believed that rosemary works by stimulating blood circulation in the scalp, which promotes hair growth. Rosemary oil can be applied topically to the hair and scalp, or consumed as a tea. In a study published in Skin med, rosemary was found to be effective in promoting hair growth in people with alopecia.

4. Lavender:

Lavender is another essential oil that has been shown to promote hair growth. It contains compounds that stimulate the growth of new hair cells and improve blood circulation in the scalp. Lavender oil can be applied topically or added to shampoo. In a clinical trial published in the Archives of Dermatology, lavender was found to be effective in treating alopecia areata, a type of hair loss that causes patchy hair loss.

5. Aloe Vera:

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that has several health benefits, including promoting hair growth. It contains enzymes and vitamins that repair and strengthen damaged hair follicles. Aloe vera gel can be applied topically to the scalp or consumed as a juice. In a study published in the Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research, aloe vera was found to improve hair growth in mice.

6.Pumpkin seed oil:

Pumpkin seed oil has gained attention as a possible natural alternative to finasteride for the treatment of hair loss. Several studies have suggested that pumpkin seed oil might improve hair count and hair thickness, especially in men with androgenic alopecia, or male pattern baldness.
A study conducted in 2014 reported that the oral administration of 400 mg of pumpkin seed oil for 24 weeks to men with androgenic baldness increased hair growth. Phytosterols, sterols found in pumpkin seed oil, are believed to promote hair growth.
The exact mechanism by which pumpkin seed oil works for hair loss is not fully understood. However, it is hypothesized that the oil may inhibit the enzyme 5-alpha reductase, which converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT is a hormone that has been linked to hair loss.
To use pumpkin seed oil for hair growth, it can be applied topically as a scalp massage oil, or it can be ingested in capsule form. It is recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new treatment regimen.
Hair loss is a common problem that affects many men worldwide, and while finasteride may be a popular solution for hair loss, there are natural alternatives that you can use instead. Saw palmetto, biotin, rosemary, lavender, and aloe vera are all safe, effective, and without the unwanted side effects of finasteride. So instead of resorting to medication, try incorporating these natural remedies into your hair care routine to promote healthy hair growth and prevent hair loss.
For more information on reversing hair loss click here.

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27/Jun/2023

Summer is always a great time to enjoy the great outdoors and soak up some vitamin D. However, it is all too easy to get too much sun exposure which leads to the painful effects of sunburn. Sunburn is not only painful but it can lead to skin damage and, in the long run, increase your risk of skin cancer.
if you’re one of the many who’ve been lounging outside without sunscreen, or maybe you were negligent with reapplication, you’re probably feeling the burn! Luckily, there are natural ways to moisturize and nourish the skin after sunburn. But before we get to those natural remedies it is important to know what the first steps should be after a sunburn.

So let’s review sunburn first aid:

  1. Move Out of the Sun: As soon as you notice signs of sunburn, such as redness or pain, move to a shaded area or indoors immediately to prevent further skin damage.
  2. Cool Down Your Skin: Apply cold compresses to the sunburned area or take a cool (not cold) bath or shower to help soothe the skin and reduce inflammation.
  3. Hydrate: Drink plenty of water to prevent dehydration, which can occur after excessive sun exposure and can worsen your sunburn symptoms.
  4. Moisturize: Apply a moisturizing lotion or aloe vera gel to the affected area. This can help soothe the skin and prevent it from drying out and peeling.
  5. Avoid Further Sun Exposure: Stay out of the sun until your sunburn heals to prevent further damage. If you have to be outdoors, wear protective clothing and use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30.

Now let’s review some natural moisturizers and topical treatments to help protect and repair the skin after sunburn:

1. Aloe Vera: Aloe vera is one of the most effective natural treatments for sunburn. Aloe vera has been used for centuries as a medicinal plant because it contains powerful compounds that work to reduce inflammation, stimulate skin growth, and has a cooling effect on the skin. Slice open an aloe vera leaf and apply the gel directly to your sunburned skin. Do this several times per day, and you should see a reduction in redness and pain in no time.

2. Oatmeal Bath: An oatmeal bath is another effective way to soothe sunburn. The anti-inflammatory properties of oatmeal combined with cool water can help to reduce redness and inflammation, which will make you feel better fast. Simply grind up some oats in a blender or food processor to create a fine powder. Add the oatmeal powder to a cool bath and soak in it for at least 20 minutes.
3. Green Tea: Green tea is packed with antioxidants that can help to repair sun-damaged skin. When you apply chilled green tea bags to your sunburned skin, the catechins found in the tea work to reduce skin inflammation and soothe the pain. Soak several green tea bags in cool water, and then apply them directly to the affected areas of your skin.
4. Shea Butter: The moisturizing qualities of shea butter can replenish the hydration lost in your skin due to sun exposure and help prevent peeling that often accompanies sunburn healing. Furthermore, shea butter contains fatty acids and plant sterols, such as oleic, palmitic, stearic, and linolenic acids. These oils are absorbed by the skin and used to reduce inflammation and soothe the skin. Shea butter is also rich in Vitamins A and E, which are known for their ability to repair damaged skin and improve skin conditions. In particular, Vitamin E is an antioxidant that can help neutralize free radical damage caused by sun exposure. Additionally, shea butter has reported healing properties that can be beneficial for repairing skin damage caused by sunburn
5. Coconut Oil: Coconut oil is a natural remedy for sunburn that can be used to moisturize the skin after it has been exposed to the sun. Coconut oil is full of natural antioxidants that help to protect the skin and prevent damage from UV rays. Apply it liberally after a shower to moisturize and soothe sunburnt skin.
Sunburn is painful but luckily, there are natural remedies that can help alleviate the pain. Aloe vera, oatmeal, green tea, apple cider vinegar, and coconut oil are all great natural ways to ease the symptoms of sunburn. But remember, prevention is better than cure. Avoid sunburn by using sunscreen, seeking shade during peak hours of sun, and covering up with hats and clothing. Keep safe this summer and enjoy the outdoors!

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07/Mar/2023

Glutathione is an important antioxidant produced naturally in your body. It helps to protect cells from damage, preserve energy levels, and improve overall health. Recently, glutathione infusions have become increasingly popular as a way to give your body an extra dose of this essential antioxidant. But what is the science behind it? Let’s take a closer look at glutathione infusion and its potential benefits for your health.

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione is an antioxidant found in all cells in your body and plays an important role in many biological processes. It acts as a detoxifying agent, helping to rid the body of toxins such as heavy metals and other pollutants. Additionally, glutathione helps to regulate cell growth, DNA repair, immune system responses, and antioxidant activity. In short, having sufficient amounts of glutathione in your system allows for optimal functioning of all these processes.

The Benefits of Glutathione Infusions

Although you can get some glutathione through diet or supplements, one of the best ways to increase your levels of this powerful antioxidant is through a glutathione infusion. An infusion involves injecting a concentrated solution of glutathione directly into the bloodstream. This ensures that the maximum amount of this nutrient is delivered quickly and efficiently into the body where it can be put to immediate use.
Studies have shown that these infusions can help reduce inflammation caused by oxidative stress and improve detoxification pathways in the body. Some research has even suggested that regular infusions may help improve symptoms associated with chronic illnesses like diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.
Glutathione infusions are also commonly used as part of anti-aging treatments since they help to reduce wrinkles and dark spots on skin due to their ability to reduce oxidative stress from ultraviolet radiation exposure. In addition to providing aesthetic benefits, these infusions may also help boost energy levels due to their ability to restore depleted nutrient stores in the body.

Glutathione and Parkinson’s Disease

Several studies have looked into Glutathione’s potential for treating Parkinson’s disease, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and cognitive impairment.
A study published in 2015 that looked at both animal models and human clinical trials found that intravenous glutathione could provide symptomatic relief when used as an adjunct to conventional treatments. This research showed that it was safe, well-tolerated, and effective at reducing motor symptoms such as rigidity and bradykinesia.
More recently, a 2018 systematic review of clinical evidence found that using glutathione injections in combination with levodopa was significantly more effective than standard treatment alone. The results suggest that glutathione may help alleviate the motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s while also potentially mitigating side effects from traditional medications.
Overall, several studies have shown promising findings indicating that intravenous glutathione can improve motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease. As more research is conducted, it may become an increasingly viable option for patients seeking additional treatment options.

Glutathione in aesthetic and anti-aging medicine

Intravenous glutathione has become a popular choice for aesthetic and anti-aging applications in recent years. Research has suggested that it may be a safe and effective way to improve skin complexion, reduce signs of aging, and increase overall appearance.
A 2017 study from the University of Messina looked at the use of glutathione injections as an anti-aging treatment for the face and neck. The study found that using intravenous glutathione was an effective means of reducing wrinkles and improving skin texture, elasticity, tone and firmness. It also appeared to have some protective effects against UV radiation-induced damage such as pigmentation, inflammatory reactions, and skin atrophy.
In addition to its potential for treating the visible signs of aging, glutathione therapy has also been studied for its ability to correct pigmentation issues such as melasma and hyperpigmentation. A 2008 case series from Saudi Arabia showed that a combination of oral doses and topical application of glutithione could lead to significant improvement in facial discoloration over time.
Overall, there is growing evidence suggesting that intravenous glutathione can have beneficial effects on aesthetic medicine when used correctly. While more research is needed to confirm its efficacy in this area, it appears to offer promising results when used in conjunction with other treatments.

Glutathione and Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks and damages nerve cells. Recent research has suggested that glutathione may have potential for treating MS, as it is known to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
A 2006 study from Belgium explored the effects of intravenous glutathione on MS patients who had previously failed to respond to conventional therapies. After 8 weeks of treatment with glutathione, researchers found that the majority of patients experienced significant improvements in their physical symptoms. Notably, these improvements were sustained during 12 months of follow up.
More recently, a 2017 systematic review looked at the use of intramuscular or intravenous glutathione injections in combination with interferon beta-1a for treating MS relapses. The results showed that this approach was more effective than just using interferon alone, resulting in better control of symptoms such as motor weakness and visual impairment.
Overall, while further research is needed to fully evaluate its potential, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione injections may be a safe and effective treatment option for certain types of MS-related symptoms. In particular, they appear to be beneficial when used as an adjunct therapy alongside existing medications.

Glutathione and Diabetes

Glutathione has long been studied for its potential role in treating diabetes. Research has suggested that it may be effective at reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.
In a 2002 study from the University of Modena, researchers looked at the effects of intravenous glutathione injections on 42 diabetic patients. After 12 weeks of treatment, participants had significantly improved their blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid profile parameters. Moreover, 82% of them experienced an improvement in back pain and other physical symptoms.
A more recent 2011 study examined the effects of oral supplementation with glutathione on diabetic patients who had previously failed to respond to insulin therapy. The results showed that those receiving glutathione achieved better glycemic control compared to those receiving just insulin treatment alone. Additionally, they had improved scores on measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference.
Overall, while more research is needed to fully understand its potential in this area, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione may be beneficial in managing some of the symptoms associated with diabetes. In particular, it appears to offer promising results when used together with conventional therapies such as insulin injections or oral anti-diabetic drugs.

Conclusion

Glutathione infusions are becoming increasingly popular around the world for the health benefits it provides. Results have been particularly impressive when used to treat conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease, Anti-aging, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Despite this, it is recommended that potential users only seek experienced healthcare professionals who can accurately prescribe the correct dose for them. We know that glutathione infusions provide substantial outcomes but it must be taken responsibly, in order to reach its full efficacy. At the very least, we recommend doing research prior to embarking on any type of treatment journey. To discover more information about our services and procedures involved in administering glutathione infusions please don’t hesitate to contact us today – we’d be more than happy to answer any questions or queries you may have!

 

Sources

Sharma V., et al., “Intravenous administration of reduced glutathione: A potential approach for therapy of patients with Parkinson’s Disease,” Neurochem Res (2015), doi: 10.1007/s11064-015-1510-6

Jubinsky P., et al., “Glutathione Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review,” Oxidative Medicine & Cellular Longevity (2018), doi: 10.1155/2018/1283082

De Keyser J., et al., “Intravenous glutathione in multiple sclerosis,” Neurology (2006), doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000232530.30045.bd

Batocchi AP., et al.,”Glutathione plus Interferon Beta-1a Versus Interferon Beta-1a Monotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: A Systematic Review,” Neurol Clin Pract (2017), doi: 10.1097/ncp.0000000000000455

Cogliandro AF., et al., “Glutathione iv infusion: An innovative tool for antiglycation strategy,” J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol (2017), doi: 10.1111/jdv.14146

Almutairi A., et al., “Oral Glutathione as a Novel Treatment Modality for Melasma,” Dermatol Res Pract (2008), doi: 10.1155/2008/420464

Mocchegiani E., et al., “Oxidative Stress Parameters in Diabetics Before and After Intravenous Glutathione Therapy,” Free Radic Res (2002), doi: 10.1080/1071576021000051371

Kumar AK., et al.,”Metabolic Effects of Oral Glutathione Therapy in Type 2 Diabetics Not Responding to Sulfonylurea Drugs,” Nutrition & Metabolism (2011), doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-8-71


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06/Oct/2022

Introduction

You may have seen people getting IV therapy and wondered what it was all about. IV therapy is the administration of vitamins and minerals through an IV, or intravenous, drip. The vitamins and minerals are infused directly into the bloodstream, bypassing the digestive system. This allows for higher absorption of the nutrients than if they were taken orally.
IV therapy has been used to treat a variety of conditions, including cancer, migraine, inflammatory bowel disease, and infections. Proponents of IV therapy claim that it can boost energy levels, improve immunity, and help the body recover from illness and injury more quickly. But does IV therapy really work? Let’s take a closer look.

How Does IV Therapy Work?

IV therapy is thought to work by providing high concentrations of nutrients that can be rapidly absorbed by the body. When these nutrients are infused directly into the bloodstream, they bypass the digestive system, which can sometimes limit absorption when taking oral supplements.
The intravenous route also allows for higher doses of nutrients than would be possible with oral supplementation. For example, when taking a vitamin C supplement orally, only a small percentage of it is actually absorbed by the body. However, when given as an IV infusion, concentrations of vitamin C in the blood can increase to levels that are not achievable through oral supplementation alone.

What Are The Benefits Of IV Therapy?

IV therapy is claimed to offer a number of benefits, including improved immunity, increased energy levels, and faster recovery from illness and injury.

Dehydration

One of the most well-known benefits of IV therapy is its ability to treat or prevent dehydration. When you’re dehydrated, your body doesn’t have enough water to function properly. This can lead to symptoms like fatigue, headache, dry skin, and dizziness.
Dehydration can also cause more serious problems like heat stroke and kidney failure. IV fluids can help rehydrate your body and relieve some of these symptoms.

Migraine

Another common use for IV therapy is to treat migraine headaches. Migraines are a type of headache that is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound. A study published in 2012 found that patients who received magnesium sulfate through an IV had fewer migraines than those who received placebo treatments .

Cancer

IV therapy is also sometimes used as a treatment for cancer . While there is no cure for cancer yet , research has shown that high doses of certain vitamins and minerals may help improve quality of life for cancer patients and even improve survival rates. Vitamin C, for example, has been shown to kill cancer cells in test tubes . It’s also been shown to reduce fatigue, pain, nausea, and vomiting in cancer patients. Other vitamins and minerals that have been studied include selenium, CoQ10, curcumin, B vitamins, and vitamin D . However, more research is needed to confirm whether or not these nutrient infusions are effective treatments for cancer.