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04/Dec/2023

Have you ever seen those circular bruises on the back of athletes’ shoulders and wondered how they got there? Chances are, they’re the result of a practice known as cupping. Cupping therapy is an age-old form of alternative medicine, originating from ancient Chinese and Egyptian cultures. The practice involves creating suction on the skin using cups, which pulls the skin upwards and increases blood flow to the area. This is believed to help mobilize blood flow, promoting healing and relieving muscle tension.

There are various types of cupping therapy, each with its unique benefits and applications. In this article, we’ll delve into three main types: flame cupping, vacuum cupping, and sliding cupping. We’ll explore their characteristics, benefits, scientific research backing their effectiveness, and the potential risks involved.

Flame Cupping

Flame cupping, also known as fire cupping, is the traditional method of cupping therapy. It involves soaking a cotton ball in alcohol, setting it alight, and then placing it inside a glass cup. The fire consumes the oxygen inside the cup, creating a vacuum as it cools, which causes the cup to stick to the skin and draw it upwards.

Research suggests that flame cupping can assist in pain management, inflammation reduction, and promote relaxation. A study published in PLoS ONE found that patients with chronic neck pain reported significant pain relief after undergoing flame cupping therapy.

However, there are risks associated with flame cupping, including burns, skin infection, and temporary skin discolouration. Therefore, it’s crucial to have this procedure performed by a trained professional.

Naturopathic Pain Management Cupping

Vacuum Cupping

Vacuum cupping, also called mechanical or suction cupping, uses a hand-held pump to create the suction effect instead of heat. This method offers more control over the amount of suction and will avoid the potential to cause burns.

Research indicates that vacuum cupping can be beneficial for conditions like fibromyalgia and chronic back pain. A systematic review in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that vacuum cupping significantly reduced pain in people with fibromyalgia compared to no treatment.

While vacuum cupping is generally safer than flame cupping, potential side effects include bruising, discomfort during the procedure, and minor skin irritation.

Slide Cupping

Slide cupping, or moving cupping, involves applying oil to the skin, creating suction in the cup, and then sliding the cup around the affected area. This technique is often used for treating large muscle groups and is particularly popular among athletes for recovery.

A study in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine reported that slide cupping could improve range of motion and decrease perceived muscle soreness in athletes.

Slide cupping shares similar risks with the other types, including possible skin irritation and discolouration.

How it works

The primary goal of cupping therapy is to enhance circulation, help relieve pain, remove “heat,” and pull out the toxins that linger in your body’s tissues. It’s believed that the suction from the cups lifts the skin and underlying tissues, leading to increased blood and lymph flow. This fresh influx of blood nourishes and repairs the targeted area, promoting healing and relaxation.

From a scientific perspective, cupping therapy may improve blood flow, reduce inflammation, and activate the immune system. The vacuum created by the cup stimulates the nervous system, which can increase blood circulation and reduce pain.

Conditions

Several studies suggest that cupping therapy may be beneficial for a variety of health conditions:

  1. Chronic Pain: A systematic review of 135 studies found evidence that cupping therapy can effectively reduce chronic neck and lower back pain.
  2. Cardiovascular Diseases: Some researchers suggest that cupping could help manage cardiovascular diseases by improving blood flow. However, more research is needed in this area.
  3. Respiratory Diseases: Cupping is traditionally used in the treatment of respiratory diseases like the common cold, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Scientific evidence supporting this use is limited but growing.
  4. Skin Diseases: Anecdotal evidence suggests that cupping may help with acne, herpes zoster, and other skin diseases. More rigorous studies are needed to confirm these effects.

It’s worth noting that cupping has been associated with some risks, particularly when done without proper training or hygiene. The most common side effects include bruising, skin irritation, and mild discomfort. More serious complications, such as infections or bleeding, are relatively rare but can occur, particularly with wet cupping. Additionally, cupping is not recommended for everyone, particularly pregnant women, people with bleeding disorders, or people taking blood thinners.

Check out more Naturopathic solutions to chronic pain Here

Conclusion

Cupping is an ancient therapy that has been used for centuries to treat a variety of conditions, but it remains a relatively mysterious and controversial practice in the West. While cupping has been associated with some potential benefits, including pain relief, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms and effectiveness. Additionally, cupping does carry some risks, particularly when done without proper training or hygiene. If you’re considering cupping as a therapy, it’s important to do your research and work with a qualified practitioner to ensure safety and effectiveness.

For more information on Cupping Click Here

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14/Nov/2023

Cancer is a serious health concern that affects millions of people worldwide. Its treatment options have come a long way in recent years. One of the latest and most promising developments in cancer treatment is intravenous vitamin C therapy. Intravenous vitamin C uses high-dose vitamin C to target cancer cells and improve overall health. In this blog post, we will explore how intravenous vitamin C therapy works, its effectiveness as monotherapy and combined treatment for cancer, and possible side effects.

How does it work?

First, let’s explore how intravenous vitamin C therapy works. Vitamin C has powerful antioxidant properties that help protect the body from oxidative stress and damage. In high doses, vitamin C produces hydrogen peroxide, which can damage cancer cells, leading to their destruction. This process is known as oxidative stress. High doses of vitamin C also helps to support the immune system, assisting the body in fighting cancer cells. The intravenous method is preferred over oral vitamin C because it allows for higher doses to be administered directly into the bloodstream.

Intravenous vitamin C therapy has been used both as monotherapy and combined treatment for cancer. As a monotherapy, it helps to slow or inhibit cancer cell growth. In some cases, it has been shown to induce apoptosis (cell death) in cancer cells. In addition, intravenous vitamin C therapy can improve the overall quality of life by reducing fatigue, nausea, and other common side effects associated with cancer treatment. When used in combination with other cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, intravenous vitamin C therapy has been shown, in many cases, to enhance their effectiveness. It can also reduce the severity of some of their side effects, making it a useful complementary therapy. However, vitamin C can interact with some chemotherapeutic agents, so it is important to consult with a specialist such as a parenteral therapy certified naturopathic doctor.

Safety and Effectiveness of IVC

A study published on CMAJ highlighted three cases where high-dose IVC was administered as cancer therapy. Despite declining systemic chemotherapy, the patients demonstrated improved health conditions post-treatment, suggesting that IVC can be a safe and effective standalone treatment method.

Another study, published in Frontiers in Oncology, focused on the effects of IVC on cancer- and chemotherapy-related fatigue and quality of life. The study reported an improvement in patients’ quality of life, further underscoring IVC’s potential benefits.

Intravenous Vitamin C Administration Improves Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients

A retrospective, multicenter study published in In Vivo showed that IVC administration improved the quality of life of breast cancer patients during chemo-/radiotherapy and aftercare. However, the study reported no effect on tumour status after 6 months of IVC administration.

Dosages, Treatment Procedure, and Side Effects

In a phase I-II clinical trial involving IVC combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy, it was observed that the concentration of vitamin C increased post-chemotherapy without a significant increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion, suggesting that higher dosages might be safely administered.

While these studies highlight the potential benefits of IVC, they also underscore the importance of understanding the possible side effects. For instance, a systematic review of IVC and cancer reported that some patients experienced mild side effects such as dry mouth and lightheadedness.

Combination with Standard Chemotherapy

The potential of IVC to enhance the effectiveness of standard chemotherapy has been explored in several studies. The study published on BioMed Central highlighted the multi-targeting effects of IVC when administered intravenously, suggesting that it could be a potent anti-cancer agent.

Conclusion:

Intravenous vitamin C therapy is a promising treatment option for cancer patients. Its effectiveness as both a monotherapy and combined treatment option has been well documented. It offers few side effects, making it a safe option for those undergoing cancer treatment. While it is not a cure for cancer, it offers hope and assistance to those in search of complementary treatment options. If you or someone you know is facing cancer, talk to a medical professional about intravenous vitamin C therapy and its potential benefits as part of a comprehensive treatment plan.

For more information on intravenous therapy Click Here


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17/Oct/2023

Blood tests are a vital tool that doctors use to detect and diagnose a wide range of conditions. From evaluating organ function to monitoring cholesterol levels, these tests give doctors valuable information about a patient’s health. However, the question remains, how often should you have your blood checked? In this post, we will explore the benefits of regular blood testing for prevention versus disease-tracking.

Prevention versus Disease Management

Prevention is the key to good health. Some blood tests can detect early warning signs of diseases like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, allowing for immediate treatment. For instance, a fasting blood sugar test can detect early stages of diabetes, allowing for lifestyle modification, and dietary change. Likewise, a lipid panel test can detect high cholesterol levels, and routine screenings could help reduce risks related to cardiovascular disease.

CEA

Preventative blood tests are especially important for individuals with a family history of certain conditions. For example, if your family has a history of colon cancer carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can be a useful screening tool for colorectal cancer. CEA is a protein that is often found in higher quantities in those with this type of cancer. Regular CEA testing can help detect the disease at an early stage, making treatment more effective and increasing the chances of survival.

PSA

Similarly, some experts recommend regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests starting at age 40, especially for men who have a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in men as early as 40 years of age could potentially help identify those at risk of developing prostate cancer. Men aged 40-49 years with a baseline PSA level above 1.0 ng/mL have been found to have a significant risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, suggesting the need for more regular monitoring.

Hormones

Hormone screening, particularly of sex hormones such as testosterone in men, and estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone in women, is a critical aspect of healthcare that can provide valuable insights into an individual’s overall health. Starting these screenings as early as in your 20s can help detect hormonal imbalances that could potentially lead to conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women or low testosterone levels in men. Early detection can enable timely intervention, possibly preventing future health issues such as infertility, osteoporosis, heart disease, or certain types of cancer. Regular hormone screenings can help maintain hormonal balance, which is vital for physical wellbeing, mental health, and sexual health. Consequently, it can dramatically improve the quality of life by ensuring optimal hormonal health throughout one’s lifetime.

Routine Blood Work

Routine blood tests are a vital tool in maintaining optimum health, as they can detect deficiencies or imbalances that could potentially lead to health problems. Key markers such as Vitamin D and B12 levels are essential for bone health and nerve function respectively. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is crucial for regulating your body’s metabolism while C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is an indicator of inflammation in the body. Liver enzymes, ferritin, and creatinine levels help monitor liver function, iron storage, and kidney function respectively.

Abnormalities in these markers can result in symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, digestive issues, mood changes, and more. Lifestyle factors including diet, physical activity, stress, and substance use can significantly affect these markers. Yearly blood tests can help identify these abnormalities early, allowing for timely intervention.

On the other hand, some diseases require more frequent monitoring and blood testing. For example, individuals with diabetes may need regular blood tests to monitor their glucose levels. Cancer patients, too, may require regular blood tests to monitor disease progression, or to check if cancer has returned even after treatment.

Conclusion:

Keeping track of your health status through blood tests is important for catching early warning signs of disease, but it also involves analyzing disease progress, response to treatment, and overall health. Ultimately, the frequency of blood tests depends on a patient’s risk profile, family history, age, and overall health status. I generally recommend yearly healthy living assessment panels for prevention and more specific testing on a more frequent basis for disease management. It is important to discuss with your doctor to determine a testing plan specific to your needs. In that way, you can ensure optimal health and well-being for a long time.

We use the two top labs in Canada: LifeLabs and Dynacare 
For a list of some tests that we offer as well as pricing CLICK HERE (Many tests are covered by a health insurance plan)

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18/Sep/2023

If you’ve ever experienced a sports injury, car accident, or slip and fall, you know the pain and frustration it can cause. It can take weeks, months, or even years to fully recover from an injury, and sometimes traditional methods such as rest, ice, and medication are not enough. Fortunately, technology has evolved, and there are new treatments available to help accelerate the healing process. One of those treatments is laser therapy. If you’ve ever wondered how laser therapy works for injury recovery, then you’re in the right place. In this blog post, we’ll explore what laser therapy is, how it works, and its benefits.

What is Laser Therapy?

Laser therapy, also known as low-level laser therapy, cold laser, or photobiomodulation therapy, is a non-invasive treatment that uses light energy to stimulate the body’s natural healing process. The therapy involves the use of a low-level laser, which emits light at a specific wavelength that penetrates the skin and targets the affected area. Unlike conventional lasers used in surgery or cosmetic treatments, low-level lasers do not produce heat, so they’re safe and painless.

How does Laser Therapy Work?

Laser therapy works by stimulating the body’s cells to produce more energy. When the light energy from the laser penetrates the skin, it’s absorbed by the cells and converted into cellular energy. This energy is used to repair damaged tissues, reduce inflammation, and alleviate pain. The light energy also activates the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a molecule that’s essential for cellular function. When cells have more ATP, they’re better equipped to carry out their functions and repair damaged tissues.

Benefits of Laser Therapy for Injury Recovery

Laser therapy has a multitude of benefits for injury recovery. The therapy helps to reduce inflammation, which is a common cause of pain and stiffness. By reducing inflammation, laser therapy can improve range of motion, decrease pain, and enhance overall mobility. Additionally, laser therapy stimulates the production of collagen, a protein that’s essential for tissue repair. By increasing collagen production, laser therapy can help speed up the healing process and improve tissue health.

Another benefit of laser therapy is the absence of side effects. Unlike medication or surgery, there are no adverse side effects associated with laser therapy. It’s safe, painless, and non-invasive. Moreover, the treatment is quick and easy, with most sessions lasting between 5-15 minutes. Patients can resume their normal activities immediately after treatment.

Fibromyalgia

Research on Laser for Sport Injury Recovery

Laser therapy has shown considerable promise in treating sports injuries. A study from the International Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine found that Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) was 65.9% effective in treating all sports injuries.

A SPIE Digital Library publication emphasized the effectiveness of Low-Intensity Laser Therapy in treating various musculoskeletal pathologies. Similarly, research from the Journal of Laser Applications suggested that athletes with sports-related injuries returned to their sports faster after treatment with low-energy lasers.

A triple-blind, sham-controlled study found that LLLT facilitated superficial wound healing, although results varied concerning its effectiveness in treating pain and restoring function in musculoskeletal injury or disease. A study on tendinopathy published on the Liebert Pub website reported benefits from low power laser sources in treating tendon and sports injuries.

Overall, these studies suggest that laser therapy, particularly LLLT, can be an effective treatment for sports injuries.

I Have found LLLT to be very effective in treating arthritis, tendonitis and other related injuries in as little as 5 treatments.

Research on Laser for Neurological Injury

A study published on the Wiley Online Library revealed that different wavelengths of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could affect functional recovery in injured peripheral nerves and traumatic brain injury in mice. Another study showed that laser therapy had a positive influence on nerve regeneration, specifically the sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

Research published on Springer highlighted the efficacy of LLLT on neurosensory recovery after damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. Another research paper indicated the positive impact of low-intensity laser therapy on recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury. A Plos One journal article also corroborated these findings, suggesting that transcranial LLLT improved neurological performance in traumatic brain injury in mice.

Further studies have shown positive effects of LLLT on neuromuscular recovery after crush injury in rat sciatic nerve, neuropathic pain relief and function recovery in rats with chronic constriction injury, and skeletal muscle repair.

How to Get Laser Therapy for Injury Recovery

If you’re interested in laser therapy for injury recovery, the first step is to consult with a healthcare professional. A licensed and qualified practitioner can assess your condition and determine if laser therapy is the right option for you. The practitioner will also determine the optimal number of treatments necessary for your condition. Treatments are typically administered in a clinical setting by a qualified professional. The number of sessions can vary depending on the severity of the injury and the desired outcome.

Conclusion

Injury recovery can be a long and challenging process. Laser therapy can help make it faster, easier, and less painful. The therapy works by stimulating the body’s natural healing process, reducing inflammation, and promoting tissue repair. Benefits of laser therapy include pain relief, improved mobility, and faster recovery time. The therapy is safe, non-invasive, and has no side effects. If you’re interested in laser therapy for injury recovery, consult with a healthcare professional to determine if it’s the right option for you. Learn more about laser therapy for chronic pain HERE

References:

  1. Wiley Online Library
  2. Springer
  3. Springer
  4. ScienceDirect
  5. Liebert Pub
  6. Springer
  7. Plos One
  8. Wiley Online Library
  9. Wiley Online Library
  10. LWW Journals

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22/Jun/2023

Almost every outdoor enthusiast has faced a tick bite once in their lifetime. These tiny creatures might seem insignificant, but they can cause provoking health issues. Lyme disease is one among them that are caused by tick bites. Therefore, it’s essential to know what to do if you find a tick on your skin.
Here’s your ultimate guide on tick removal and prevention of Lyme disease.

Step 1: Remove The Tick

Tick removal is the first step towards your prevention of Lyme disease. To remove the tick safely, you need to have essential tools, such as fine-tipped tweezers or a tick removal tool.
Now, use these tools to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Pull the tick upward with steady, even, and controlled pressure. Try not to twist the tick or jerk it, as this can cause mouth parts to remain in the skin. If the mouth part remains, use tweezers to remove it.
After removing the tick, clean the area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.

Step 2: Save The Tick

It might sound strange, but saving the tick can help you to test for diseases and know better about the treatment. So, always save the tick in a clean plastic bag or a small container with a lid. Write the date when you were bitten and where the tick most likely bit you on the container so you don’t forget later.

Step 3: Monitor Your Symptoms

After tick removal, it’s important to monitor symptoms and seek medical attention if necessary. Lyme disease can present with nonspecific symptoms like fever, headache, muscle aches, fatigue, and a circular, reddish skin rash. Symptoms of some other tick-borne diseases may not show up for weeks or months.
If symptoms appear, seek medical attention immediately. Remember to tell your healthcare provider that you have been bitten by a tick and when and where the bite occurred. The more details you can provide, the easier it is for your doctor to determine if you need further testing or treatment.

Step 4: Prevention Of Lyme Disease

The best way to prevent Lyme disease is to avoid being bitten by ticks. Wear light-colored clothing, so it’s easier to spot a tick on you. Tuck your pants into socks and your shirt into your pants, so ticks can’t easily access your skin. Use insect repellent when outdoors in areas where ticks are more likely to reside (wooded areas and tall grass).
DEET is an effective insect repellent however there are some potential hazards with excessive use such as: Skin irritation, allergic reaction, eye irritation, and neurological effects. Here is a list of DEET free insect repellents that work against ticks:
  1. Lemon Eucalyptus Oil: A natural repellent derived from the lemon eucalyptus tree, it is effective against mosquitoes and ticks.
  2. Picaridin: A synthetic repellent that resembles the natural compound piperine found in black pepper plants, it is effective against various insects and ticks.
  3. Geraniol: A natural alcohol found in many essential oils like geranium, citronella, and lemongrass, it repels mosquitoes, ticks, and other insects.
  4. Neem Oil: Extracted from the neem tree, it provides protection against various insects, including mosquitoes, but may be less effective against ticks.
  5. Cedarwood Oil: An essential oil derived from cedar trees, it is effective against mosquitoes, ticks, and other insects.
After coming inside from areas where ticks may be present (like grassy fields or wooded areas), take a shower to wash off any unattached ticks or use a lint roller on your clothing.

Step 5: Check Yourself And Your Pets For Ticks

Always check yourself, your kids, and your pets after being outside, especially in grassy and wooded areas. Pay special attention to hard-to-see spots like scalp, armpits, groin, and behind knees. Use a mirror for those hard-to-see areas, or ask a loved one to help.

Conclusion:

Tick bites can seem like a minor concern, but they can cause major health issues, such as Lyme disease. Knowing the right steps to take when bitten is essential to prevent long-term consequences. Remember to remove the tick correctly with tweezers, seek medical attention if necessary, and prevent tick bites by using insect repellent, checking for ticks, and practicing caution in tick-infested areas. Stay safe and enjoy the great outdoors!

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19/May/2023

Vitamin injections have gained a lot of popularity in recent years, especially among celebrities and influencers. From improving skin clarity to boosting energy levels, the promised benefits of vitamin infusions are endless. However, are these claims backed by science, or is it just clever marketing? In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at the ingredients in these celebrity vitamin infusions, the actual benefits they provide, and separate hype from fact.

The Ingredients:

A typical celebrity vitamin infusion usually contains a mixture of vitamins, minerals, and sometimes amino acids. Popular ingredients include vitamin C, B-vitamins, calcium, selenium, zinc and magnesium. These vitamins and minerals play an important role in almost all biological processes but do they really need to be injected rather than obtained through diet?

The Benefits:

Many celebrities claim that vitamin injections help with everything from weight loss to anti-aging. Still, most of these alleged benefits are based on anecdotal evidence rather than any scientific findings.
Let’s take a look at some of the actual research behind intravenous vitamins and minerals in order to separate fact from fiction.

Myers Cocktail:

The Myers’ Cocktail is an intravenous (IV) treatment that consists of a combination of vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, calcium, vitamin C, and various B vitamins. It was developed by Dr. John Myers in the 1960s and has been used to address various health conditions such as fatigue, migraines, fibromyalgia, and others. While there is limited research on the Myers’ Cocktail, some studies have explored its potential benefits:
  1. A study by Gaby (2002) published in “Alternative Medicine Review” provided a review of the clinical experience with the Myers’ Cocktail. The author reported that the IV treatment had shown positive effects on various conditions, including acute asthma attacks, migraines, fatigue, fibromyalgia, and chronic sinusitis. However, it’s important to note that this review is based on clinical observations rather than randomized controlled trials.
  2. A randomized controlled trial by Ali et al. (2009) published in “Medical Science Monitor” investigated the effects of the Myers’ Cocktail on fibromyalgia patients. The study found that the participants who received the IV treatment experienced significant improvements in pain, tender points, and depression compared to the control group.
  3. In a pilot study by Zhang et al. (2012) published in “Global Advances in Health and Medicine,” the researchers studied the effects of the Myers’ Cocktail on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. They reported improvements in fatigue levels, but the small sample size and lack of a control group limit the study’s conclusions.

High dose Vitamin C for Cancer?

Yes, there has been research exploring the potential benefits of high-dose intravenous vitamin C in cancer treatment. However, the results are mixed, and more research is needed to establish its effectiveness conclusively. Here are a few notable studies:
  1. A study by Ma et al. (2014) published in “Science Translational Medicine” found that high-dose intravenous vitamin C selectively killed colorectal cancer cells with specific genetic mutations. The authors suggested that vitamin C might be used as a targeted therapy in some cases.
  2. A study by Welsh et al. (2013) published in “Cancer Cell” reported that high-dose intravenous vitamin C enhanced the effects of chemotherapy in mouse models of pancreatic cancer. The authors concluded that vitamin C could be a potential adjuvant in pancreatic cancer treatment.
  3. A systematic review by Fritz et al. (2014) published in “Canadian Medical Association Journal” analyzed several clinical trials on the use of intravenous vitamin C in cancer patients. They found that intravenous vitamin C was safe and well-tolerated, but its effectiveness in improving survival and quality of life was inconclusive.
  4. A phase II clinical trial by Hoffer et al. (2015) published in “PLOS ONE” investigated the effects of intravenous vitamin C combined with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with stage 3 or 4 non-small cell lung cancer. The study found no significant improvement in overall survival, progression-free survival, or tumor response with the addition of vitamin C.

Magnesium:

Several research studies have explored the potential benefits of intravenous magnesium infusion in various clinical settings. Here are a few notable articles:
  1. James et al. (2010) published a study in “The Lancet” that investigated the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on patients at risk for developing eclampsia. They found that magnesium sulfate significantly reduced the risk of eclampsia and maternal death in women with pre-eclampsia.
  2. Shiga et al. (2012) conducted a study published in the “Journal of the American College of Cardiology” that demonstrated the benefits of intravenous magnesium sulfate in reducing the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.
  3. In a meta-analysis by Fawcett et al. (1999) published in the “British Medical Journal,” the researchers found that intravenous magnesium infusion reduced the risk of death in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction.
  4. A study by Cinar et al. (2011) published in “Anesthesiology” examined the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. The study found that magnesium infusion reduced postoperative opioid consumption and improved pain scores.
  5. Miller et al. (2010) published a study in “Headache” that investigated the effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate on acute migraines. They found that magnesium infusion provided rapid and sustained pain relief in patients with migraines who had low serum ionized magnesium levels.

Glutathione:

Glutathione is an antioxidant that plays a crucial role in cellular detoxification and maintaining overall health. Research on glutathione infusion is limited, but several studies have explored its potential benefits in various clinical settings. Here are a few notable articles:
  1. A study by Hauser et al. (2009) published in “Neurology” investigated the effects of intravenous glutathione on Parkinson’s disease symptoms. They found that glutathione infusion improved symptoms in Parkinson’s patients, but the study had a small sample size and lacked a control group.
  2. A pilot study by Kern et al. (2011) published in “Medical Science Monitor” evaluated the effects of intravenous glutathione infusion on children with autism. The study reported improvements in some behavioral measures of autism, but the small sample size and lack of a control group limit the conclusions that can be drawn.
  3. A study by Pizzorno et al. (2014) published in “Integrative Medicine” assessed the impact of intravenous glutathione on quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia. The authors reported significant improvements in pain, energy, and overall well-being, but the study was not randomized or controlled.
  4. In a study by Allen et al. (2017) published in “Redox Biology,” the researchers explored the effects of intravenous glutathione on cystic fibrosis patients. They found that glutathione infusion improved lung function and reduced inflammation, suggesting potential benefits for cystic fibrosis patients.
  5. A study by Naito et al. (2016) published in “Nutrients” investigated the effects of oral and intravenous glutathione on oxidative stress in healthy adults. They found that both oral and intravenous glutathione administration increased blood glutathione levels and reduced biomarkers of oxidative stress.

The Risks:

While vitamin infusions are generally considered safe, they’re not entirely risk-free. Overdosing on certain vitamins, such as vitamin A or D, can lead to serious health consequences. Furthermore, injecting vitamins can put a strain on your liver and kidneys, which is particularly concerning for people with pre-existing liver or kidney conditions.

The Alternatives:

Most of the time we can obtain the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants our body requires thorough a healthy diet. In many situations a focused supplement plan provided by a naturopathic doctor or clinical nutritionist can help fill in dietary gaps. Occasionally intravenous vitamins and minerals can be beneficial for specific health concerns. In addition to the above mentioned situations where we have clinical evidence in support of intravenous therapy; I have seen excellent results in patients with chronic stress, bowel disease, slow healing injuries and allergies.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, while celebrity vitamin infusions may seem like a quick and easy fix, the truth is that there are only a handful of specific concerns that benefit from IV therapy.
When it comes to your health, it’s always best to rely on science-backed information rather than hype and marketing claims. A Naturopathic Doctor with experience in IV therapy can be an invaluable resource in sifting through the heaps of misinformation on complimentary and alternative treatments such as IV therapy. Interested in making an appointment? Book a free 15min introductory consult with me today!

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07/May/2023

Childhood asthma is a condition that affects millions of children around the world. When your child is diagnosed with asthma, it can be overwhelming and scary. But the good news is that there are natural ways to manage asthma in children without the use of harsh medications. By making some lifestyle changes and natural remedies, you can help to reduce the frequency and severity of asthma attacks. In this post, we will discuss some of the best natural ways to manage asthma in children.

1. Maintain a Healthy Diet

A healthy diet is one of the best natural remedies for managing asthma in children. Studies have shown that a diet that is rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains can help reduce the incidence of asthma in children.
According to a paper published in the Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators, a balanced, diverse diet that includes plenty of fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk for asthma among children and adolescents. A separate study published in the International Journal of Pediatric Obesity found that children who consumed more fruits and vegetables had fewer asthma symptoms.
In particular, nutrients such as vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids appear to be especially beneficial for children with asthma. One review of several studies, published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, found that higher intakes of vitamin C, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids were associated with better lung function and fewer asthma symptoms in children.
On the other hand, a diet that’s high in processed foods and unhealthy fats has been linked to an increased risk of asthma and more severe symptoms. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a diet high in saturated fats, trans fats, and refined sugars was associated with an increased risk of asthma in children.

2. Get Enough Sleep

Sleep is very important for a healthy immune system and body. Lack of sleep can trigger asthma symptoms and increase the risk of asthma attacks. Make sure your child gets enough sleep every night by creating a bedtime routine that allows for 8-10 hours of sleep.
Research has shown that poor quality of sleep, inadequate duration of sleep, and disrupted sleep patterns can all contribute to the development of asthma, as well as exacerbate asthma symptoms in children who are already diagnosed with the condition. According to one study, children with asthma who had poor sleep quality were more likely to report asthma-related symptoms such as wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath, compared to children who had good sleep quality. Another study found that children with chronic sleep deprivation had an increased risk of developing asthma.
Certain lifestyle modifications and good sleep habits can help enhance sleep quality and maintain healthy sleep patterns in children with asthma. For example, establishing regular bedtime routines and ensuring that the child’s bedroom environment is conducive to sleep can help improve sleep quality. Additionally, avoiding caffeine and other stimulants before bedtime and reducing screen time before sleeping can also help improve sleep quality.

3. Stay Active

Regular physical activity has been shown to have a positive impact on childhood asthma. Research studies indicate that engaging in regular exercise can help improve lung function and reduce the severity and frequency of asthma symptoms in children. Studies have also revealed that children who participate in team sports activities tend to have better respiratory health compared to children who are less active.
Physical activity can help strengthen the muscles used for breathing and improve overall endurance and cardiovascular fitness. A study published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology found that children with asthma who participated in a six-week physical activity program saw significant improvement in lung function and reduced the need for medication compared to those who did not participate in the program.

4. Supplementation

Certain natural supplements have been shown to be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of childhood asthma. Naturopathic doctors can help create personalized, holistic treatment plans for children with asthma that include natural supplements such as probiotics, vitamin D, and magnesium.
Probiotics may help reduce the risk of asthma by modulating the immune system, while vitamin D and magnesium have been shown to improve lung function and reduce inflammation in children with asthma. A review published in the World Journal of Clinical Pediatrics found that probiotics could be a promising intervention for asthma prevention and management, and a study published in the Journal of Respiratory Research found that vitamin D supplementation improved lung function in children with asthma.
Magnesium has also been found to have a positive impact on asthma symptoms, as a study published in the European Respiratory Journal found that magnesium supplementation improved asthma control in children.

5. Keep The Air Clean

Poor air quality can trigger asthma symptoms in children. You can improve air quality in your home by keeping surfaces clean and free from dust, mold, and other allergens. Keep windows and doors open to allow fresh air in. Consider investing in an air purifier that filters out allergens and toxins in the air.

Conclusion:

Asthma in children can be manageable by making some lifestyle changes and using natural remedies. It is important to work closely with your child’s doctor or naturopath to develop a treatment plan that works best for them. Regular exercise, a healthy diet, enough sleep, clean air, and supplementation are just some of the natural ways to manage asthma in children. With proper management, your child can live an active and healthy life.

References:

  1. Varraso R, Garcia-Aymerich J, Monier F, et al. Assessment of dietary intake in subjects with asthma and atopic dermatitis: validation of a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(6): 814-20. https://www.nature.com/articles/1601621
  2. Almqvist C, Garden F, Xuan W, et al. Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid exposure from early life does not affect atopy and asthma at age 12. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;119(6):1438-1444. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17544305
  3. Wright RJ, Cohen S, Carey V, Weiss ST, Gold DR. Parental stress as a predictor of wheezing in infancy: a prospective birth-cohort study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002;165(3):358-365. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11850319
  4. Romieu I, Sienra-Monge JJ, Ramírez-Aguilar M, et al. Antioxidant supplementation and lung functions among children with asthma exposed to high levels of air pollutants. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002;166 (5):703-709. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12204881
  5. Sutherland ER, Goleva E, Jackson LP, et al. Vitamin D levels, lung function, and steroid response in adult asthma. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010;181(7):699-704. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3115833/
  6. Maslova E, Hansen S, Jensen CB, Olsen SF. Dietary intake and development of atopic eczema in childhood. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2012;23(3):206-213. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2011.01225.x
  7. Butland BK, Fehily AM, Elwood PC. Diet, lung function, and lung function decline in a cohort of 2512 middle aged men. Thorax. 2000;55(2):102-108. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10639558
  8. Wood LG, Garg ML, Gibson PG. A high-fat challenge increases airway inflammation and impairs bronchodilator recovery in asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011;127(5):1133-1140. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21281860
  9. Nutrition recommendations and interventions for diabetes: a position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care. 2007;30 (Suppl 1):S48-S65. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/30/Supplement_1/S48
  10. Szentpetery SE, Kim HJ, Kleinhenz ME, et al. Sleep quality and asthma control and quality of life in non-severe and severe asthma. Sleep Breath. 2012; 16(4):1129-1137. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11325-011-0636-1
  11. Guo YF, Liu FS, Lu M, et al. Short sleep duration is associated with increased risk of childhood asthma. J Asthma. 2019;56(7):759-767. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02770903.2018.1492065
  12. Lu KD, Loh A, Petersen C, et al. Sleep and asthma. Sleep Med Rev. 2019;45:31-40. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1087079218300708
  13. Chee CG, Kim S, Lee KJ, et al. Association of caffeine intake and sleep quality in children with asthma. J Asthma Allergy Educ. 2011;2(5):205-210. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3577184/
  14. Calamaro CJ, Mason TB, Ratcliffe SJ. Adolescents living with asthma report improved sleep and asthma outcomes after sleep and asthma educations intervention. J Pediatr Health Care. 2011;25(2):103-109. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0891524510003075
  15. Lang JE, Hossain MJ, Lima JJ. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: pathophysiology and management. Expert Rev Respir Med. 2011;5(1):91-101. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3021425/
  16. Orenstein DM. Effect of exercise on airway function in cystic fibrosis and asthma. Clin Chest Med. 2000;21(1):147-161. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10763022
  17. Hull JH, Skinner S, Phillips D, et al. Asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in amateur athletes. Br J Gen Pract. 2003;53(489):638-641. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1314468/
  18. Yammine S, Marzuillo P, Israel E. Update on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in athletes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. Expert Rev Respir Med. 2020;14(1):75-83. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17476348.2020.1687293
  19. Freitas Jr LRd, Ribeiro MA. Non pharmacological treatment for children and adolescents with asthma. J Pediatr. 2014;90(5 Suppl 1):S40-7. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021755714001111
  20. Cabana MD, McKean M, Caughey AB, et al. Early probiotic supplementation for eczema and asthma prevention: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2017;140(3):e20163000. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28765378/
  21. Litonjua AA, Carey VJ, Laranjo N, et al. Effect of prenatal supplementation with vitamin D on asthma or recurrent wheezing in offspring by age 3 years: the VDAART randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2016;315(4):362-370. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26813209/
  22. Hill J, Micklewright A, Lewis S, Britton J. Investigation of the effect of short-term change in dietary magnesium intake in asthma. Eur Respir J. 1997;10(10):2225-2229. https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/10/10/2225

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01/May/2023

More and more families are choosing to adopt a vegan or vegetarian diet. According to a recent study published by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, plant-based diets can meet all nutritional needs for infants and children. However, parents must be mindful about the potential nutritional deficiencies that may arise with these diets. In this blog post, I will discuss the most common nutrient deficiencies that vegan and vegetarian kids might experience and provide tips on how to ensure they get enough nutrients.

1. Vitamin B12

Vegan and vegetarian diets are often low in Vitamin B12 since it is most commonly found in animal products. This nutrient is necessary for healthy brain function, red blood cell production, and DNA synthesis. Fortunately, several vegan sources of B12 are available, including fortified foods such as plant-based milks, cereals, and nutritional yeast. Parents can also give their kids a B12 supplement or buy a vegan B12 supplement spray.
Some common symptoms of B12 deficiency in kids include:
  • Delayed development
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Pale skin
  • Poor appetite
  • Numbness or tingling in hands and feet
  • Difficulty walking and balancing
  • Behavioral changes
  • Cognitive difficulties
  • Mouth ulcers or sores
  • Anemia (low red blood cell count)

Recommendation: Active Chewable B12 from Genestra provides 1mg of Methyl-B12 in a cherry flavored chewable tablet. It is vegan, gluten, dairy and soy free.

2. Iron

Iron is essential for the production of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. Iron deficiency is common in vegan and vegetarian kids because plant-based sources of iron (such as beans, lentils, and leafy greens) are not as easily absorbed as animal-derived iron. To increase iron absorption, parents should pair iron-rich foods with vitamin C foods such as citrus fruits. When iron deficiency is present it can be difficult to raise levels sufficiently with diet alone. Iron supplementation can be useful, however, it is important to do so under the care of a family physician or naturopathic doctor. Too much iron can be as problematic as too little.
Some common symptoms of iron deficiency in kids include:
  • Pale skin or lips
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Irritability or fussiness
  • Poor appetite
  • Decreased growth and development
  • Increased infections
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Brittle nails
  • Headaches

Recommendation: Floradix Liquid Iron is a great tasting vegetarian friendly iron supplement with synergistic B-vitamins.

3. Protein

Many people wonder whether a vegan diet can provide adequate protein for growing kids. The answer is undoubtedly yes! Plants like beans, lentils, tofu, and quinoa pack significant protein. However, it is essential to combine these protein sources with whole grains to create complete protein. It is also okay to offer plant-based protein sources throughout the day and not all at once. Edamame, nut butter, and vegan protein shakes are excellent options. Check out my article on Nutritional Requirements for kids to gain an idea of how much protein your child requires. If a protein deficiency in suspected, using a protein supplement can be an easy way to boost your child’s daily protein consumption.
Some signs and symptoms of protein deficiency in kids include:
  • Edema or swelling in the feet, hands, or belly
  • Slow growth or failure to thrive
  • Loss of muscle mass
  • Delayed wound healing
  • Weak or brittle hair and nails
  • Loss of appetite or difficulty eating
  • Irritability or mood changes
  • Lowered immunity, leading to increased infections

Recommendations: Progressive Nutritionals Harmonized Fermented Vegan Protein is a vegan option high in protein and easy to digest. It is available in vanilla and chocolate.

4. Calcium

Calcium is critical for strong bones, muscles, and teeth. While dairy products are the most common source of calcium, vegan kids can get enough calcium from plant-based sources like fortified non-dairy milk, broccoli, bok choy, and kale. Parents can also offer vegan calcium supplements.
Some common signs and symptoms of calcium deficiency in kids include:
  • Delayed development and growth
  • Weak bones that are prone to fractures
  • Muscle cramps and spasms
  • Numbness and tingling in the fingers, toes, or face
  • Weak and brittle nails
  • Tooth decay and other dental problems
  • Fatigue or lethargy
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Irritability or mood changes
  • Loss of appetite

Recommendation: Calcium Kids Chewable tablets from Progressive Nutritional’s provides calcium and other micronutrients in a great tasting sugar free and vegetarian format.

5. Zinc

Zinc is essential for growth and development, immune system function, and wound healing. Zinc can be found in nuts, seeds, and legumes, and fortified cereals. Parents could also offer vegan supplements to ensure adequate zinc intake. it is important to note that long term zinc supplementation can cause copper deficiency. Therefore, it is important to supplement under the supervision of a physician, nutritionist or naturopathic doctor.
Some common signs and symptoms of zinc deficiency in kids include:
  • Delayed growth and development
  • Poor appetite and weight loss
  • Delayed wound healing
  • Diarrhea and other digestive issues
  • Increased infections
  • Skin rash or dry skin
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Hair loss
  • Difficulty concentrating or memory problems
  • Mood changes, such as irritability or depression

Recommendation: Kids Liquid Zinc with Vitamin C from Organika is a product I have used with many patients. It provides 3.5mg of zinc with 200mg of vitamin C in a great tasting easy to use liquid format.

Conclusion:

If done right, a vegan or vegetarian diet can provide all the nutrients necessary for growing kids. However, it is essential to be mindful of potential nutrient deficiencies and incorporate nutrient-rich, plant-based foods into meals. If parents choose to offer supplements, it is best to talk to a healthcare professional first. With the right approach, vegan and vegetarian diets can be healthy and satisfying for kids.

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14/Apr/2023

FPIES (Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome) is a type of food allergy that affects the gastrointestinal system. It typically affects infants and young children and is characterized by severe vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration.
The exact cause of FPIES (Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome) is not fully understood, but there are several theories behind its etiology. Here are some examples: