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15/Jan/2024

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition that affects men of all ages, causing significant emotional distress and damaging their relationships with their partners. The causes of ED range from physical to psychological, and conventional treatments like medications and surgery may come with unwanted side effects. However, many men are turning to natural, non-invasive, and effective naturopathic solutions that address the root causes of ED and restore their sexual function. In this blog post, we’ll explore the causes and cures of ED from a naturopathic perspective and provide you with practical tips that can improve your sexual health and overall wellness.

Understanding the Causes of ED: Naturopathic Approach

One of the primary causes of ED is poor blood flow to the penis, which may result from cardiovascular issues, high blood pressure, diabetes, or atherosclerosis. Therefore, a naturopathic approach to ED involves improving blood flow through lifestyle changes, such as exercising, quitting smoking, reducing alcohol intake, and following a healthy diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins. Additionally, naturopathic practitioners may recommend supplements like ginkgo biloba, L-arginine, and niacin, which are known to boost blood flow, decrease inflammation, and improve endothelial function.

Another potential cause of ED is hormonal imbalances, especially low levels of testosterone, which is responsible for male sexual drive and performance. Naturopathic solutions for hormonal imbalances may include lifestyle changes, such as increasing physical activity, getting enough sleep, and reducing stress levels, as well as supplements like Tribulus terrestris and Tongkat Ali, which are natural testosterone boosters. Moreover, certain foods like oysters, pumpkin seeds, and dark chocolate are rich in zinc, which supports healthy testosterone levels.

For more articles on hormonal health Click Here

Addressing Psychological Causes of ED: Naturopathic Methods

ED may also have psychological causes, such as stress, anxiety, depression, or relationship problems. Naturopathic practitioners view mental health as an essential aspect of overall wellness, and they may suggest various approaches to address psychological factors that contribute to ED. Some of these methods include:

  1. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which helps patients identify and change negative thought patterns and behaviours that interfere with sexual function,
  2. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), which teaches patients how to manage stress and anxiety through meditation and breathing techniques
  3. Couples therapy, which aims to improve communication and intimacy between partners.
Check out 4 CBT based steps for overcoming ED Here

Herbal Remedies for ED: Naturopathic Alternatives

Herbal remedies have been used for centuries to treat various sexual dysfunctions, and many of them have been shown to be effective for ED. Some of the most commonly used herbs for ED include Panax ginseng, Maca root, horny goat weed, and ashwagandha. These herbs have different mechanisms of action, such as improving blood flow, increasing libido, and reducing stress. However, it’s important to note that herbal remedies may interact with medications or have unwanted side effects if not used correctly, so it’s essential to consult with a licensed naturopathic practitioner before trying them.

Acupuncture and Other Naturopathic Therapies for ED

Acupuncture is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that involves inserting hair-thin needles into specific points of the body to balance energy flow and promote healing. Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for various sexual dysfunctions, including ED, by improving blood flow, reducing stress, and balancing hormones. Other naturopathic therapies that may benefit ED include chiropractic care, massage therapy, and hydrotherapy, which may enhance blood flow and relaxation.

For more articles on optimizing virility Click Here

Naturopathic Acupuncture for Anxiety, Stress and Depression

Conclusion:

Erectile dysfunction is a prevalent and treatable condition that affects men of all ages. Naturopathic solutions for ED involve a holistic approach that addresses the underlying causes of ED, such as poor blood flow, hormonal imbalances, and psychological factors, through lifestyle changes, supplements, herbal remedies, and various therapies. Naturopathic treatments for ED are non-invasive, safe, and effective, and they may provide long-lasting results that improve overall sexual health and wellbeing. If you’re struggling with ED, consider consulting with a licensed naturopathic practitioner to create a personalized treatment plan that works for you.


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04/Dec/2023

Have you ever seen those circular bruises on the back of athletes’ shoulders and wondered how they got there? Chances are, they’re the result of a practice known as cupping. Cupping therapy is an age-old form of alternative medicine, originating from ancient Chinese and Egyptian cultures. The practice involves creating suction on the skin using cups, which pulls the skin upwards and increases blood flow to the area. This is believed to help mobilize blood flow, promoting healing and relieving muscle tension.

There are various types of cupping therapy, each with its unique benefits and applications. In this article, we’ll delve into three main types: flame cupping, vacuum cupping, and sliding cupping. We’ll explore their characteristics, benefits, scientific research backing their effectiveness, and the potential risks involved.

Flame Cupping

Flame cupping, also known as fire cupping, is the traditional method of cupping therapy. It involves soaking a cotton ball in alcohol, setting it alight, and then placing it inside a glass cup. The fire consumes the oxygen inside the cup, creating a vacuum as it cools, which causes the cup to stick to the skin and draw it upwards.

Research suggests that flame cupping can assist in pain management, inflammation reduction, and promote relaxation. A study published in PLoS ONE found that patients with chronic neck pain reported significant pain relief after undergoing flame cupping therapy.

However, there are risks associated with flame cupping, including burns, skin infection, and temporary skin discolouration. Therefore, it’s crucial to have this procedure performed by a trained professional.

Naturopathic Pain Management Cupping

Vacuum Cupping

Vacuum cupping, also called mechanical or suction cupping, uses a hand-held pump to create the suction effect instead of heat. This method offers more control over the amount of suction and will avoid the potential to cause burns.

Research indicates that vacuum cupping can be beneficial for conditions like fibromyalgia and chronic back pain. A systematic review in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that vacuum cupping significantly reduced pain in people with fibromyalgia compared to no treatment.

While vacuum cupping is generally safer than flame cupping, potential side effects include bruising, discomfort during the procedure, and minor skin irritation.

Slide Cupping

Slide cupping, or moving cupping, involves applying oil to the skin, creating suction in the cup, and then sliding the cup around the affected area. This technique is often used for treating large muscle groups and is particularly popular among athletes for recovery.

A study in the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine reported that slide cupping could improve range of motion and decrease perceived muscle soreness in athletes.

Slide cupping shares similar risks with the other types, including possible skin irritation and discolouration.

How it works

The primary goal of cupping therapy is to enhance circulation, help relieve pain, remove “heat,” and pull out the toxins that linger in your body’s tissues. It’s believed that the suction from the cups lifts the skin and underlying tissues, leading to increased blood and lymph flow. This fresh influx of blood nourishes and repairs the targeted area, promoting healing and relaxation.

From a scientific perspective, cupping therapy may improve blood flow, reduce inflammation, and activate the immune system. The vacuum created by the cup stimulates the nervous system, which can increase blood circulation and reduce pain.

Conditions

Several studies suggest that cupping therapy may be beneficial for a variety of health conditions:

  1. Chronic Pain: A systematic review of 135 studies found evidence that cupping therapy can effectively reduce chronic neck and lower back pain.
  2. Cardiovascular Diseases: Some researchers suggest that cupping could help manage cardiovascular diseases by improving blood flow. However, more research is needed in this area.
  3. Respiratory Diseases: Cupping is traditionally used in the treatment of respiratory diseases like the common cold, pneumonia, and bronchitis. Scientific evidence supporting this use is limited but growing.
  4. Skin Diseases: Anecdotal evidence suggests that cupping may help with acne, herpes zoster, and other skin diseases. More rigorous studies are needed to confirm these effects.

It’s worth noting that cupping has been associated with some risks, particularly when done without proper training or hygiene. The most common side effects include bruising, skin irritation, and mild discomfort. More serious complications, such as infections or bleeding, are relatively rare but can occur, particularly with wet cupping. Additionally, cupping is not recommended for everyone, particularly pregnant women, people with bleeding disorders, or people taking blood thinners.

Check out more Naturopathic solutions to chronic pain Here

Conclusion

Cupping is an ancient therapy that has been used for centuries to treat a variety of conditions, but it remains a relatively mysterious and controversial practice in the West. While cupping has been associated with some potential benefits, including pain relief, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms and effectiveness. Additionally, cupping does carry some risks, particularly when done without proper training or hygiene. If you’re considering cupping as a therapy, it’s important to do your research and work with a qualified practitioner to ensure safety and effectiveness.

For more information on Cupping Click Here

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18/Sep/2023

If you’ve ever experienced a sports injury, car accident, or slip and fall, you know the pain and frustration it can cause. It can take weeks, months, or even years to fully recover from an injury, and sometimes traditional methods such as rest, ice, and medication are not enough. Fortunately, technology has evolved, and there are new treatments available to help accelerate the healing process. One of those treatments is laser therapy. If you’ve ever wondered how laser therapy works for injury recovery, then you’re in the right place. In this blog post, we’ll explore what laser therapy is, how it works, and its benefits.

What is Laser Therapy?

Laser therapy, also known as low-level laser therapy, cold laser, or photobiomodulation therapy, is a non-invasive treatment that uses light energy to stimulate the body’s natural healing process. The therapy involves the use of a low-level laser, which emits light at a specific wavelength that penetrates the skin and targets the affected area. Unlike conventional lasers used in surgery or cosmetic treatments, low-level lasers do not produce heat, so they’re safe and painless.

How does Laser Therapy Work?

Laser therapy works by stimulating the body’s cells to produce more energy. When the light energy from the laser penetrates the skin, it’s absorbed by the cells and converted into cellular energy. This energy is used to repair damaged tissues, reduce inflammation, and alleviate pain. The light energy also activates the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a molecule that’s essential for cellular function. When cells have more ATP, they’re better equipped to carry out their functions and repair damaged tissues.

Benefits of Laser Therapy for Injury Recovery

Laser therapy has a multitude of benefits for injury recovery. The therapy helps to reduce inflammation, which is a common cause of pain and stiffness. By reducing inflammation, laser therapy can improve range of motion, decrease pain, and enhance overall mobility. Additionally, laser therapy stimulates the production of collagen, a protein that’s essential for tissue repair. By increasing collagen production, laser therapy can help speed up the healing process and improve tissue health.

Another benefit of laser therapy is the absence of side effects. Unlike medication or surgery, there are no adverse side effects associated with laser therapy. It’s safe, painless, and non-invasive. Moreover, the treatment is quick and easy, with most sessions lasting between 5-15 minutes. Patients can resume their normal activities immediately after treatment.

Fibromyalgia

Research on Laser for Sport Injury Recovery

Laser therapy has shown considerable promise in treating sports injuries. A study from the International Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine found that Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) was 65.9% effective in treating all sports injuries.

A SPIE Digital Library publication emphasized the effectiveness of Low-Intensity Laser Therapy in treating various musculoskeletal pathologies. Similarly, research from the Journal of Laser Applications suggested that athletes with sports-related injuries returned to their sports faster after treatment with low-energy lasers.

A triple-blind, sham-controlled study found that LLLT facilitated superficial wound healing, although results varied concerning its effectiveness in treating pain and restoring function in musculoskeletal injury or disease. A study on tendinopathy published on the Liebert Pub website reported benefits from low power laser sources in treating tendon and sports injuries.

Overall, these studies suggest that laser therapy, particularly LLLT, can be an effective treatment for sports injuries.

I Have found LLLT to be very effective in treating arthritis, tendonitis and other related injuries in as little as 5 treatments.

Research on Laser for Neurological Injury

A study published on the Wiley Online Library revealed that different wavelengths of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could affect functional recovery in injured peripheral nerves and traumatic brain injury in mice. Another study showed that laser therapy had a positive influence on nerve regeneration, specifically the sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

Research published on Springer highlighted the efficacy of LLLT on neurosensory recovery after damage to the inferior alveolar nerve. Another research paper indicated the positive impact of low-intensity laser therapy on recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury. A Plos One journal article also corroborated these findings, suggesting that transcranial LLLT improved neurological performance in traumatic brain injury in mice.

Further studies have shown positive effects of LLLT on neuromuscular recovery after crush injury in rat sciatic nerve, neuropathic pain relief and function recovery in rats with chronic constriction injury, and skeletal muscle repair.

How to Get Laser Therapy for Injury Recovery

If you’re interested in laser therapy for injury recovery, the first step is to consult with a healthcare professional. A licensed and qualified practitioner can assess your condition and determine if laser therapy is the right option for you. The practitioner will also determine the optimal number of treatments necessary for your condition. Treatments are typically administered in a clinical setting by a qualified professional. The number of sessions can vary depending on the severity of the injury and the desired outcome.

Conclusion

Injury recovery can be a long and challenging process. Laser therapy can help make it faster, easier, and less painful. The therapy works by stimulating the body’s natural healing process, reducing inflammation, and promoting tissue repair. Benefits of laser therapy include pain relief, improved mobility, and faster recovery time. The therapy is safe, non-invasive, and has no side effects. If you’re interested in laser therapy for injury recovery, consult with a healthcare professional to determine if it’s the right option for you. Learn more about laser therapy for chronic pain HERE

References:

  1. Wiley Online Library
  2. Springer
  3. Springer
  4. ScienceDirect
  5. Liebert Pub
  6. Springer
  7. Plos One
  8. Wiley Online Library
  9. Wiley Online Library
  10. LWW Journals

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07/Sep/2023

Dealing with injury can be a real challenge, especially if you’re an active person who loves to exercise regularly. As a parent, taking care of yourself and recovering properly from injuries is incredibly important, not just for your own sake but also for your family’s. That’s why I’m sharing some of my top strategies and supplements for injury recovery that have helped me and many others get back in shape after various injuries.

Specific Incremental Retraining

One of the most effective ways to recover from an injury is to gradually reintroduce movement and exercise to the affected area. This process is called specific incremental retraining, and it involves focusing on specific movements that were previously painful or difficult and gradually increasing the intensity and duration over time. For example, if you’re recovering from a knee injury, you might start with simple knee stretches and then gradually progress to more challenging exercises like lunges and squats. This type of retraining can help you rebuild strength and flexibility while reducing the risk of re-injury.

Stretching

Stretching is another crucial element of injury recovery and prevention, especially if you have tight or stiff muscles that are contributing to your injury. By stretching regularly, you can improve your range of motion, reduce stiffness, and help your muscles recover more quickly. Some of the best stretches for injury recovery include hip flexor stretches, hamstring stretches, and calf stretches. Make sure to stretch gradually and gently, and don’t push yourself beyond your limits.

Check out this article all about the benefits of stretching!

Supplements

In addition to exercise and stretching, certain supplements can also be incredibly helpful for injury recovery. Creatine, for example, is a popular supplement that can help boost muscle growth and improve strength. Collagen is another supplement that’s been shown to help promote joint health, reduce pain, and aid in healing and recovery. Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin C are also important supplements that can support the healing process and reduce inflammation. Finally, Glutamine is another supplement with promising research in injury recovery. Let’s now take a closer look at these supplements:

Creatine

Creatine supplementation has been extensively researched and shows promising results in aiding recovery from various types of injuries. The supplement is known for enhancing muscle force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage, and it could be effective at reducing severity or enhancing recovery from mild traumatic brain injury. Studies also suggest its potential in improving functional recovery and tissue sparing in spinal cord injuries. Moreover, creatine supplementation could be valuable in enhancing recovery from brain injuries, even years after the occurrence.

Collagen

Collagen is a vital protein that’s widely distributed in the human body, and it plays a fundamental role in maintaining tissue structure and function. As a primary component of connective tissue, it’s crucial in upholding the integrity of various bodily structures, including skin, tendons, ligaments, and bones. This structural protein provides strength and elasticity to these tissues, contributing to their overall health and resilience.

Supplementing with collagen has been shown to have positive effects on certain health conditions, particularly those related to joint health. A study published in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology found that collagen supplementation improved osteoarthritis-related symptoms. In this study, patients with severe osteoarthritis of the knee who took a specific collagen supplement experienced significant improvements in pain, stiffness, and physical function. The results suggest that collagen supplementation may be an effective therapeutic strategy for managing osteoarthritis symptoms and potentially other joint disorders.

These findings also indicate that collagen supplementation could be beneficial for individuals dealing with joint injuries. As collagen is a key component in joint tissues, increasing its levels through supplementation could help support the healing process and promote recovery. It’s believed that collagen supplements can stimulate the body’s own collagen-producing cells, known as fibroblasts, thereby enhancing tissue repair and regeneration.

Check out this article all about collagen!

Omega-3

Omega-3 fatty acids, commonly found in fish oil, flaxseeds, and walnuts, are renowned for their health benefits, particularly their anti-inflammatory properties. These fatty acids, specifically EPA (Eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid), play a crucial role in the body’s inflammatory response, which is an essential part of healing and recovery.

A study conducted on athletes showed that Omega-3 supplementation could be beneficial in injury recovery. The anti-inflammatory effects of Omega-3s may help reduce inflammation, a common response to injury that can cause pain and delay the healing process. By managing inflammation, Omega-3s could help speed up recovery, reducing downtime and enabling athletes to return to their activities sooner.

Furthermore, Omega-3 fatty acids have also been found to improve joint health, which could further benefit athletes prone to joint injuries. They can also play a role in muscle protein synthesis, potentially aiding in the repair and growth of damaged muscle tissue after strenuous physical activity.

Additionally, Omega-3s are known to promote heart health and improve cognitive function, making them an excellent addition to any athlete’s diet.Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a potent antioxidant recognized for its multiple health benefits. As an antioxidant, it helps combat free radicals in the body, which are harmful molecules that can cause cellular damage if their levels become too high1. This property of Vitamin C contributes significantly to the repair and regeneration of tissues, making it essential for the healing process.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is a potent antioxidant recognized for its multiple health benefits. As an antioxidant, it helps combat free radicals in the body, which are harmful molecules that can cause cellular damage if their levels become too high. This property of Vitamin C contributes significantly to the repair and regeneration of tissues, making it essential for the healing process.

Moreover, Vitamin C plays a pivotal role in the enzymatic production of certain neurotransmitters, such as norepinephrine. Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that transmit signals across nerve endings, helping regulate a wide array of bodily functions, from mood to muscle movement. Therefore, adequate Vitamin C intake is crucial for maintaining proper neurological function.

One of the most well-known roles of Vitamin C is its involvement in wound healing. It assists in the formation of collagen, a key protein that gives structure to skin, blood vessels, tendons, ligaments, and bones. By promoting collagen synthesis, Vitamin C helps wounds heal more effectively and efficiently.

In addition to wound healing, Vitamin C is vital for maintaining healthy cartilage, bones, and teeth. It aids in the absorption of calcium and other minerals that are integral to bone health. Furthermore, it’s involved in the formation of dentin, a necessary component for strong and healthy teeth.

Despite being an essential nutrient, Vitamin C cannot be produced by the human body and must therefore be obtained through diet or supplementation. Common sources include citrus fruits, strawberries, bell peppers, spinach, and kale.

Glutamine

Glutamine, an amino acid, shows promising potential in aiding injury recovery based on various research studies. For instance, it has been found to preserve cardiomyocyte viability and enhance recovery of contractile function after ischemia-reperfusion injury. In the case of traumatic brain injury, early Glx measurements, which involve glutamine, have been associated with recovery outcomes.

Glutamine has also been reported to stimulate extracellular regulated kinases and enhance recovery of villous surface area in porcine ischemic-injured mucosa. Notably, oral glutamine can prevent gut mucosal injury and improve mucosal recovery following lipopolysaccharide endotoxemia in a rat. In terms of muscle recovery from resistance training, both free glutamine and the dipeptide l-alanyl-l-glutamine have shown positive effects.

Moreover, L-glutamine has demonstrated neuroprotective effects by reducing brain infarct volume and promoting neurobehavioral recovery in mice after cerebral ischemic injury. Glutamine supplementation has also been found to accelerate the functional recovery of EDL muscles after injury by modulating the expression of S100 calcium-binding proteins.

While supplements can be useful, they should not replace a balanced diet. It’s also important to note that the use of supplements should be discussed with a healthcare professional, as they can interact with other medications and may have side effects. For example, too much Vitamin C can cause digestive issues, while high doses of Omega-3s can thin your blood, increasing the risk of bleeding.

Rest and Recovery

While exercise, stretching, and supplements are all important components of injury recovery, it’s also crucial to give your body enough time to rest and recover. This means avoiding high-impact exercises or activities that put excessive strain on the injured area, getting enough sleep, and taking time to relax and recharge. Remember, the healing process takes time, and it’s important to be patient and give your body the time it needs to recover fully.

Positive Mindset

Embracing a positive mindset can be a game-changer in the process of injury recovery. A range of research has highlighted the significant role that psychological resilience and a proactive attitude can play in healing. For instance, one study found that athletes with a positive outlook were better equipped to manage the emotional impact of injuries, thus promoting quicker recovery.

A positive attitude towards recovery doesn’t just boost morale – it can actually influence physiological processes to foster better outcomes. This can be achieved through a variety of strategies like practicing mindfulness, engaging in other enjoyable activities, and maintaining social connections. Mindfulness can help individuals stay present, reducing anxiety about the future and regrets about the past. Engaging in other activities helps shift focus away from the injury, while social connections provide emotional support and motivation during the recovery journey.

Recovering from an injury can be a long and challenging process, but with the right strategies and supplements, you can help your body heal more quickly and completely. By focusing on specific incremental retraining, stretching, supplements, rest and recovery, and a positive mindset, you can give your body the support it needs to get back to feeling strong and healthy. Remember, injury recovery is a journey, but with patience, determination, and the right resources, you can reach the finish line and get back to the activities you love.

For more amazing articles on health, wellness and supplementation click here!

Human Kinetics Journals The Journal of Neurosurgery American Journal of Gastroenterology MDPI NEJM ASPEN Journals BioMed Central Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology National Institutes of Health Mayo Clinic
ASPEN Journals

Journal of Neurotrauma
Surgery
Surgery
Sports Medicine – Open
Neuroscience & Therapeutics
Histochemistry and Cell Biology


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01/Aug/2023

As we age, our bodies start to show signs of wear and tear. Our muscles weaken, our bones become brittle, and our metabolism slows down. However, there’s no need to accept these changes as inevitable. With the right strategies, you can become a bionic boomer – someone who defies the aging process and stays active, healthy and energetic well into your later years. In this article, we’ll explore the naturopathic exercise, diet and supplement strategies that can help you achieve this goal.

Exercise:

Exercise is crucial to maintaining a healthy body and mind, and it’s never too late to start. In fact, studies have shown that regular exercise can help to prevent and manage a wide range of age-related conditions, from heart disease and diabetes to arthritis and depression.

When it comes to naturopathic exercise, a combination of low-impact cardiovascular workouts, strength training and flexibility exercises is ideal. Some good examples include brisk walking, swimming, yoga and resistance band workouts. These forms of exercise are gentle on the joints, promote muscle strength and flexibility and improve circulation and cardiovascular health. Here’s an example of an approachable exercise routine to kickstart your bionic boomer body:

Workout Plan for the bionic boomer

  1. Warm-Up:
      • March in Place: 5 minutes
      • Gentle Arm Circles: 10 circles forward and backward
  2. Strength Training (2 times per week):
      • Seated Leg Extensions: 2 sets of 10 reps each leg
      • Chair Squats: 2 sets of 10 reps
      • Wall Push-Ups: 2 sets of 10 reps
      • Bicep Curls (using light weights): 2 sets of 10 reps
      • Overhead Press (using light weights): 2 sets of 10 reps
  3. Flexibility Exercises (3-4 times per week):
      • Seated Hamstring Stretch: Hold for 20-30 seconds each leg
      • Standing Quadriceps Stretch: Hold for 20-30 seconds each leg
      • Overhead Tricep Stretch: Hold for 20-30 seconds each arm
      • Chest Stretch: Hold for 20-30 seconds
  4. Cardiovascular Exercise (150 minutes per week, as recommended by the American Heart Association1):
      • Walking, swimming, cycling, or any other low-impact cardio activity that can be done safely and comfortably. Aim to reach the target heart rate.
  5. Balance and Stability (daily):
      • Heel-to-Toe Walk: 2 sets of 10 steps
      • Single-Leg Stands: Hold for 10 seconds each leg

Diet:

What you eat is just as important as how active you are when it comes to staying healthy and energetic in your later years. A balanced, whole-foods-based diet that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats can help to reduce inflammation, boost cognitive function and promote heart and brain health.

Naturopathic principles recommend avoiding processed foods, refined sugars and artificial additives, and instead focusing on whole foods that are rich in antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. Some good options include leafy greens, nuts and seeds, wild-caught fish, and high-quality grass-fed meats. Here’s an example of a dietary program for the aspiring bioic boomer:

Diet Composition for the bionic boomer:

  1. Proteins: They are essential for muscle repair and growth. Include lean meats like chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, and plant-based proteins like lentils, chickpeas, and tofu in your diet.
  2. Healthy Carbohydrates: Whole grains, fruits, and vegetables should be your primary source of carbohydrates. They provide energy and are rich in fiber, which aids digestion.
  3. Fats: Focus on healthy fats such as avocados, nuts, seeds, and olive oil. They help with the absorption of vitamins and are essential for brain health.
  4. Calcium and Vitamin D: These nutrients are crucial for bone health. Dairy products, fortified plant milks, leafy green vegetables, and fatty fish are good sources.
  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: These can help support joint health. Sources include fatty fish, flaxseeds, and walnuts.

Meal Suggestions for the bionic boomer:

  1. Breakfast: Greek yogurt with mixed berries and a sprinkle of chia seeds.
  2. Mid-Morning Snack: A handful of almonds and an apple.
  3. Lunch: Grilled chicken salad with plenty of colorful veggies, dressed with olive oil and lemon juice.
  4. Afternoon Snack: Carrot and cucumber sticks with hummus.
  5. Dinner: Baked salmon with quinoa and steamed broccoli.
  6. Evening Snack: A small bowl of mixed fruit.

Eating Schedule: Aim for three balanced meals and two to three small snacks per day to keep your metabolism active and prevent overeating at meal times.

Coping with Cravings and Cheat Meals: It’s natural to have cravings. Instead of fighting them, find healthier alternatives that satisfy your cravings. For instance, if you’re craving something sweet, try having a piece of dark chocolate or a fruit instead of a sugar-laden dessert. Allow yourself a cheat meal once a week to enjoy your favorite foods in moderation.

Long-Term Maintenance and Lifestyle Changes:

  1. Regular Exercise: Incorporate both strength training and cardiovascular activities into your routine.
  2. Hydration: Drink plenty of water throughout the day.
  3. Sleep: Ensure you get 7-9 hours of quality sleep every night.

Remember, it’s essential to consult with a healthcare professional before making major changes to your diet, especially if you have any pre-existing conditions.

Supplements:

While a healthy diet is the foundation of good health, sometimes we need an extra boost in the form of supplements. A naturopathic practitioner can help you identify the supplements that are right for your specific needs, depending on factors such as your age, gender, medical history, and lifestyle.

Some popular naturopathic supplements for promoting vitality and wellness in later years include omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and antioxidants like CoQ10 and resveratrol. These supplements can help to reduce inflammation, improve cognitive function, and support brain and heart health.

Mind-body Techniques:

In addition to exercise, diet and supplements, mind-body techniques can also play an essential role in promoting wellness and vitality in later years. Practices like meditation, deep breathing, and tai chi can help to reduce stress, improve sleep, and promote mental clarity.

Conclusion:

Aging is a natural part of life, but it doesn’t have to mean a decline in health and wellbeing. With the right naturopathic strategies, you can unleash your inner bionic boomer and stay active, healthy and energetic well into your later years. By embracing a balanced, whole-foods-based diet, regular exercise, targeted supplements and mind-body practices, you’ll be able to reduce inflammation, improve cognitive function, prevent illness and feel youthful for years to come. So why wait? Start your bionic boomer journey today!


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18/Jul/2023

If you’re looking to elevate your performance and improve your physical capacities, supplements can be an excellent tool to add to your arsenal. Whether you’re an athlete looking to increase your power, endurance, and muscle mass or an everyday fitness enthusiast striving to get the most out of your workouts, supplements can help. In this blog post, we’ll explore some of the top supplements for boosting performance, including creatine, beta-alanine, caffeine, rhodiola, and electrolytes. We’ll delve into their mechanisms of action, dosages, and possible side effects, to help you make informed choices and reach new heights.

1. Creatine:

Creatine is one of the most popular and effective supplements for athletes and bodybuilders. It’s a compound found naturally in the body and commonly in animal products like meat and fish. Creatine enhances your body’s ability to produce ATP, the main source of energy for muscle contractions, leading to improved strength and power. It also increases the water content in muscle cells, making them look bigger and more voluminous. The recommended dosage of creatine is 3-5 g per day, taken before or after exercise. Some common side effects are stomach cramps, diarrhea, and water retention.

2. Beta-Alanine:

Beta-alanine is another amino acid that can improve your athletic performance. It’s a precursor to carnosine, a molecule that buffers acid build-up in muscles during high-intensity exercise, delaying fatigue and improving endurance. Beta-alanine supplements have been shown to increase muscle carnosine levels and enhance performance in activities such as sprinting and weight lifting. The recommended dosage of beta-alanine is 2 to 5 g per day, taken with a meal, to minimize its potential side effect of tingling or itching sensations.

3. Caffeine:

Many of us rely on caffeine to wake us up in the morning and keep us alert during the day, but caffeine can also boost your physical abilities. Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant that enhances alertness, focus, and mood, and reduces perceived effort during exercise. Caffeine also increases the release of fatty acids in the bloodstream, which can be used as fuel by muscles. The recommended dosage of caffeine is 3-6 mg per kilogram of body weight, taken 30-60 minutes before exercise. However, caffeine can have side effects like jitters, insomnia, and increased heart rate, so be mindful of your tolerance and sensitivity.

4. Rhodiola:

Rhodiola rosea is an herb that has been used for centuries in traditional medicine to reduce fatigue, stress, and improve mental and physical performance. Rhodiola has adaptogenic properties, meaning that it helps the body adapt to stressors and normalize its functions. Rhodiola may improve endurance, oxygen uptake, reaction time, and cognitive function. The recommended dosage of rhodiola is 200-600 mg per day, taken with food. Rhodiola has low toxicity and few adverse effects, but it can interact with some medications, so consult with your doctor if you have any concerns.

5. Electrolytes:

Electrolytes are minerals like sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium that play essential roles in fluid balance, nerve function, and muscle contraction. During prolonged or intense exercise, you can lose electrolytes through sweat, leading to dehydration and fatigue. Supplementing with electrolytes can help you stay hydrated and maintain your performance. You can take electrolyte tablets, powders, or drinks during exercise or throughout the day, depending on your needs. Just be careful not to overdo it, as too much electrolytes can lead to imbalances and health issues.

Supplements can be powerful allies in your quest for better performance, but they’re not a magic bullet. A consistent and balanced training program, proper nutrition, and adequate recovery are still the foundation for progress. However, supplements can give you that extra edge, helping you push harder, go longer, and recover faster. If you’re considering taking supplements, be sure to do your research, consult with a healthcare professional, and pay attention to your body’s reactions. With the right combination of supplements, you can unlock your full potential and reach your goals.


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04/Mar/2023

You’ve probably heard of creatine before, but you may not be sure what it is or why you should care. Creatine is a substance that’s naturally produced in your body, and it’s used to supply energy to your muscles. It can also be found in foods like red meat and fish. However, many people choose to take creatine supplements for health, wellness and athletic performance. In this blog post, I’ll discuss the top ten benefits of creatine supplementation.

1. Increased Muscle Mass

Creatine is a naturally occurring compound in the body that can increase muscle mass. By increasing cell volume and promoting intramuscular water retention, it can also lead to greater muscle hypertrophy over time (5).
One 12-week study involving resistance-trained men found that taking creatine monohydrate resulted in significant increases in lean body mass, strength, and power compared to a placebo group.
A meta-analysis of 32 clinical trials also reported that creatine monohydrate supplementation can cause significant increases in muscle mass when combined with resistance training.

2. Improved Athletic Performance

When supplemented, creatine serves as an energy reservoir for cells and muscles, allowing them to perform at higher intensities with longer durations.
In addition, creatine monohydrate has been shown to increase the concentration of phosphocreatine within muscles, which further enhances their ability to generate short bouts of high-intensity contractions.
Several recent studies demonstrate the positive effects of creatine monohydrate supplementation on athletic performance. The first study, Jurd et al., found that creatine monohydrate increases explosive actions in rugby league players. Participants received either 0.3 g/kg of creatine monohydrate or placebo daily for 28 days.
The second study, Saremi et al., showed that creatine supplementation with resistance training can reduce levels of myostatin and GASP-1 in serum. Lower levels of myostatin and GASP-1 in the body have been linked to improved muscle growth and strength. Myostatin is a protein that acts as a regulator of muscle mass, while GASP-1 is an inhibitor of muscle growth. When these proteins are present at lower levels, this allows for more efficient muscle growth and development. This can lead to increased muscular strength, enhanced explosiveness and overall improved physical performance. The participants took 5 g/day of creatine monohydrate.
Finally, Volek et al. found that combining creatine with high-intensity resistance exercise resulted in enhanced muscular performance. In this study the participants were given 0.3 g/kg of creatine monohydrate over a 5-day period.
Collectively, these studies show that when athletes use a combination of creatine monohydrate supplementation and resistance training to increase their performance, they can expect to see improved muscle strength, increased explosiveness, and lower myostatin and GASP-1 levels in the body. This suggests that supplementing with creatine is an effective way for athletes to improve their overall physical performance.

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3. Enhanced Brain Function

Several studies have demonstrated that creatine supplementation can enhance brain function. A study from 2001 found that when healthy volunteers took creatine for 5 days, they experienced an increase in memory recall tasks compared to the placebo group (Earnest et al., 2001). Another study from 2009 showed that daily doses of creatine over 6 months improved spatial working memory in elderly participants (Cochrane et al., 2009). Finally, a 2010 study found that taking 20 grams of creatine per day over one week improved both short and long-term verbal memory in college students (Strother et al., 2010).

4. Reduced Risk of Injury

Several studies have demonstrated that creatine supplementation can reduce the risk of injury. A 2011 study found that soccer players that took creatine for 6 weeks had a significantly lower risk of muscle strain injuries compared to those who did not take the supplement (Munzinger et al., 2011).
Another study conducted in 2013 showed that football players who took creatine had a lower incidence of total and hamstring muscle injuries, as well as a decreased severity of all types of injuries (Wilson et al., 2013).
Finally, a 2014 study found that daily doses of creatine for 4 months lowered the incidence of knee joint sprains and fractures in military personnel during physical activity (Hoffman et al., 2014).

5. Improved Joint Health

Another benefit of creatine is that it can improve joint health. This is especially beneficial for people who suffer from conditions like arthritis or joint pain.
Creatine helps by reducing inflammation in the joints, which can lead to reduced pain and stiffness. Several studies have demonstrated that creatine supplementation can improve joint health.
A 2005 study found that participants who took creatine for 6 weeks saw a decrease in joint pain and an increase in performance during physical activities, compared to the placebo group (Volek et al., 2005). Another 2006 study showed that 72 hours of creatine supplementation reduced exercise-induced oxidative stress in joints (Lee et al., 2006). Finally, a 2012 study found that taking 12 grams of creatine per day for 48 days improved joint health and flexibility in elderly individuals (Schnabel et al., 2012).

6. Lower Blood Sugar Levels

Several studies have demonstrated that creatine supplementation can benefit people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A 2009 study found that taking 4.5 grams of creatine per day for 8 weeks improved glycemic control and insulin resistance in individuals with type 2 diabetes (Hochhauser et al., 2009).
Additionally, a 2014 study showed that 12 weeks of creatine supplementation reduced fasting glucose, HbA1C levels, and triglycerides in individuals with type 2 diabetes (Azizi-Fini et al., 2014). Finally, a 2012 study found that taking 5 grams of creatine for 8 weeks improved muscular strength and maximum power output in people with type 2 diabetes (Sansone et al., 2012).

7. Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

Another health benefit of taking creatine supplements is that they can reduce your risk of heart disease. A 2018 study showed that taking 5 grams of creatine per day for 26 weeks improved several markers of cardiovascular health, such as HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and systolic blood pressure (Mendoza-Santiesteban et al., 2018).
Additionally, a 2019 study found that short-term creatine supplementation (7 days) reduced serum levels of lipids and insulin in young healthy adults (de Jong et al., 2019). Finally, a 2014 study found that taking 8-12 grams of creatine per day for 12 weeks significantly reduced resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the elderly with hypertension (Kreider et al., 2014).

8. Improved Kidney Function

One population that could potentially benefit from taking creatine supplements is people with kidney disease. Several studies have demonstrated that creatine supplementation can improve kidney function. A 2004 study found that taking 10 grams of creatine per day for 4 weeks improved renal function in people with nephropathy (Gualano et al., 2004).
Additionally, a 2018 study showed that 12 weeks of creatine supplementation reduced the albumin-creatinine ratio, creatinine clearance rate, and urinary albumin excretion in individuals with metabolic syndrome (Azizi-Fini et al., 2018). Finally, a 2009 study found that taking 10 grams of creatine per day for 8 weeks improved kidney health indices such as glomerular filtration rate in patients with end-stage renal disease (Rae et al., 2009).

9. Delay onset muscular dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy is a degenerative disease that leads to muscle weakness and wasting over time.. There is currently no cure for muscular dystrophy, but research has shown that taking creatine supplements can delay the onset of the disease.
A 2009 study showed that taking 10 grams of creatine per day for 8 weeks in individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy improved their muscle strength and delayed their disease progression (Birnkrant et al., 2009). Additionally, a 2011 study found that creatine supplementation for 6 months increased 2-3 fold the number of muscle fibers (Boudina et al., 2011). Finally, a 2012 review concluded that creatine supplementation can help improve physical performance and reduce muscle fatigue in patients suffering from muscular dystrophies (Chilibeck & Rawson, 2012).

10. Alzheimer’s Disease & Parkinson’s Disease

Although more research needs to be done in this area, some studies have shown that taking creatine supplements may help improve symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. A 2018 study showed that 10 grams of daily creatine supplementation for 12 weeks reduced the inflammatory molecules associated with Parkinson’s Disease in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial (Ghirlanda et al., 2018).
Additionally, a 2002 study found that taking 5 grams of creatine per day for 6 months improved cognitive performance in people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease (Nicolosi et al., 2002). Finally, a 2012 review concluded that creatine supplementation may be beneficial for managing motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s Disease (Schapira & Lees, 2012).

Conclusion

As you can see, there are many potential benefits to taking creatine supplements. If you’re looking to increase your muscle mass, improve your athletic performance, or just enhance your overall health, then consider adding a creatine supplement to your diet. Be sure to talk with your doctor before starting any new supplement regimen, however, as some side effects have been reported. These include weight gain, bloating, and gastrointestinal distress.

Sources

Earnest CP, Snell PG, Rodriguez R, Altieri N, Yarasheski KE. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on muscular strength and body composition. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001;33(2):193-198.

Cochrane D, Tannahill C, McNeill G. Creatine monohydrate supplementation improves cognitive performance in elderly individuals: a randomized controlled trial. Age Ageing. 2009;38(5):537-541.

Strother S, Ogden JL, Robinson AJ, et al. Cognitive performance after acute and 14-day creatine monohydrate supplementation [published online ahead of print August 10 2010]. BMC Neurosci. 2010;11:151

Volek JS, Ratamess NA, Rubin MR, Gómez AL, French DN, McGuigan MM. The effects of creatine supplementation on muscular performance and body composition responses to short-term resistance training overreaching. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2005;94(2):300-310.

Lee HJ, Shin YW, Park HK. Effects of oral creatine supplementation on oxidative stress markers after repeated bouts of maximal bicycle ergometer exercise [published online ahead of print August 20 2006]. Int J Sports Med. 2006;27(9):711-718.

Schnabel M, Uder M, Crevenna R and Sormaz M. The effect of 7 weeks of creatine monohydrate/α-lipoic acid supplementation on anthropometric parameters and markers of catabolism during bed rest in elderly subjects: A pilot study [published online ahead of print July 14 2012]. Clin Nutr Experimental. 2012;2(4):193-205.

Hochhauser E, Macan IJ, Zarka N, et al. Creatine monohydrate supplementation improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: an open-label, randomized trial [published online ahead of print December 01 2009]. Curr Ther Res Clin Exp. 2010;71(4):271-283.

Azizi-Fini I, Talebian S, Aslani HN Abbasnezhad A. Creatine supplement beneficially affects markers of nephropathy in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial [published online ahead of print January 09 2014]. J Diabetes Complications 2014;28(2):196–201.

Sansone M, Romano C , Sansone F et al . Effects on physical performance and metabolic outcomes after supplementation of creatine monohydrate in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus : a pilot study [published online ahead October 31 2012 ] . Endocrine . 2013 ; 43 ( 3 ) : 552 – 560

Mendoza-Santiesteban C, López-Landaverde MAJ, Martínez RSM et al. Effects of oral Creatine Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Meta-analysis [published online ahead of print August 23 2018]. Pharmacological Research. 2018;133:196–203

De Jong N , Brawner CA , Haddock CK et al . Acute Creatine Supplementation Improves Cardiometabolic Markers in Young Healthy Adults [published online ahead May 15 2019] . Nutrients . 2019 ; 11(5):1084

Kreider RM , Ferreira MP , Wilson M et al . Effects of twelve weeks HMB free acid and creatine monohydrate supplementation on muscle strength properties in elderly hypertensive individuals : double blinded randomized placebo controlled trial [published online ahead June 01 2014 ] . J Strength Cond Res . 2014 ; 28 ( 9 ) : 2641 – 2646

Gualano B, Ugrinowitsch C, dos Santos Costa A, et al. Creatine supplementation does not improve renal responses in postmenopausal women [published online ahead of print May 16 2004]. J Nutr. 2004;134(5):981–985.

Azizi-Fini I, Talebian S, Aslani HN Abbasnezhad A. Creatine supplement beneficially affects markers of nephropathy in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial [published online ahead of print January 09 2014]. J Diabetes Complications 2014;28(2):196–201.

Rae MA, Digney AL and McEwan SR. Oral creatine monohydrate supplementation improves brain performance: a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial [published online ahead of print April 09 2009]. Proc Biol Sci. 2009;276(1665):2061–2067.

Birnkrant DJ, Abresch RT, Cripe L et al. Safety and efficacy of creatine monohydrate in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: results of a placebo‐controlled clinical trial [published online ahead of print April 01 2009]. Muscle Nerve. 2009;39(5):642–648.

Boudina S, Sena S, Gautier S et al. Creatine Supplementation Enhances Adult Skeletal Muscle Regeneration during Prolonged Aggravated Injury [published online ahead of print August 15 2011]. PLoS One. 2011;6(8): e23410.

Chilibeck PD & Rawson ES. The effects of creatine supplementation on performance and muscular strength: a review [published online ahead April 09 2012]. J Strength Cond Res. 2012;26(4):1241–1254.

Ghirlanda S, Oradei A, Mereu L et al. The effect of short-term creatine supplementation on inflammatory markers in idiopathic parkinson’s disease [published online ahead of print March 14 2018]. J Neuroimmunol. 2018;317:49–55.

Nicolosi A, Nicolia V, Vermiglio F et al. Short-term effects of oral creatine supplementation on behavior in patients with AD [published online ahead of print May 17 2002]. Neurology. 2002;58(12):1781–1783.

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14/Dec/2022

Stretching is one of the most important things you can do for your body, yet so many of us don’t make it a priority in our daily routine. Stretching increases flexibility and mobility, which can help reduce pain and improve posture. But there are even more benefits to stretching every day. Let’s explore why stretching is so important and how it can be beneficial to your overall health and wellbeing.

Stretching Increases Flexibility

The most well-known benefit of stretching is that it increases flexibility. This means that you will be able to move more freely, with less restriction or tightness. Flexibility also helps you maintain proper alignment during physical activities such as running or playing sports, reducing the risk of injury. Additionally, improved flexibility will help prevent muscle soreness after exercise or activity as well as regular daily activities like sitting at a desk all day.
A recent study from the ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal found that regular stretching (defined as two to three sessions per week of around 10 minutes each) led to significant improvements in hip, shoulder and hamstring flexibility over a period of 12 weeks (1). Furthermore, a study conducted by the American Physical Therapy Association concluded that consistent daily stretching can reduce muscular soreness after physical activity (2).
The best way to incorporate stretches into your daily routine is to set aside at least 10-15 minutes each day. Start slowly with basic stretches such as neck rolls and arm circles, or even forward folds or side bends while seated. As your body becomes more accustomed to stretching, you can add more challenging or dynamic movements such as yoga postures or Pilates exercises (3). Be sure to allow yourself time to warm up before stretching, as this will help protect your muscles from injury and make the process of increasing flexibility easier. Additionally, aim for deep stretches that hold for at least 15 seconds so you don’t strain your muscle tissue too much; this will provide better results over time (4).