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20/May/2024

Ensuring optimal health and wellness requires a proactive approach. As a healthcare provider, I always recommend a series of comprehensive tests and panels for all new patients. These tests offer invaluable insights into various aspects of your health, enabling personalized care and early detection of potential issues. Here are my top five recommended tests and panels:

1. LifeLabs: Enhanced Healthy Living Assessment Panel

Overview:

The Enhanced Healthy Living Assessment Panel from LifeLabs is a comprehensive screening tool designed to offer a holistic view of your overall health. It includes a broad spectrum of tests that evaluate critical factors such as blood glucose levels, cholesterol, liver function, kidney function, and more.

Why It’s Crucial:

This panel serves as a foundational health check, identifying any imbalances or abnormalities that could affect your long-term wellness. By getting a detailed snapshot of various biomarkers, we can tailor a health plan specifically designed for your needs.

What It Tests For:

  • Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  • Lipid Profile (Cholesterol, LDL, HDL, Triglycerides)
  • Liver Function Tests (ALT, AST, ALP, Bilirubin)
  • Kidney Function (Creatinine, eGFR)
  • Blood Glucose Levels
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin B12

Benefits:

  • Early detection of health issues
  • Comprehensive understanding of your current health status
  • Benchmark data for future comparisons

2. LifeLabs: Female/Male Hormone Panel

Overview:

Hormones play a pivotal role in regulating numerous bodily functions, including metabolism, reproductive health, and mood. The Female/Male Hormone Panel from LifeLabs is designed to assess hormone levels, helping to identify imbalances that could be affecting your health.

Why It’s Crucial:

Hormonal imbalances can lead to a variety of health issues, including fatigue, weight gain, mood swings, and fertility problems. This panel provides a detailed analysis of key hormones, enabling targeted interventions that can help restore balance.

What It Tests For:

  • Testosterone
  • Estrogen (Estradiol)
  • Progesterone
  • Cortisol
  • Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

Benefits:

  • Identification of hormonal imbalances
  • Personalized treatment plans for hormonal health
  • Improved overall well-being

3. RMA: Food Sensitivity IgG Panel

Overview:

The Food Sensitivity IgG Panel from Rocky Mountain Analytical (RMA) tests for IgG antibodies to identify potential food sensitivities. Unlike immediate allergic reactions (IgE), IgG-mediated reactions can cause delayed symptoms, making them harder to pinpoint.

Why It’s Crucial:

Food sensitivities can lead to chronic inflammation, digestive issues, and other health problems. Identifying and eliminating trigger foods can significantly improve your quality of life and alleviate a range of symptoms.

What It Tests For:

  • Over 200 common foods, including dairy, grains, nuts, fruits, and vegetables

Benefits:

  • Identification of trigger foods causing adverse reactions
  • Alleviation of chronic symptoms like bloating, headaches, and fatigue
  • Enhanced digestive health and overall well-being

4. LifeLabs: Apolipoprotein B

Overview:

Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a protein involved in lipid metabolism and is a key marker for cardiovascular risk. Elevated ApoB levels are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and heart disease.

Why It’s Crucial:

Traditional lipid profiles may not provide a complete picture of cardiovascular risk. Measuring ApoB offers a more accurate assessment, particularly for individuals with normal LDL cholesterol but still at risk for heart disease.

What It Tests For:

  • Apolipoprotein B levels

Benefits:

  • More accurate cardiovascular risk assessment
  • Personalized strategies for heart disease prevention
  • Improved cardiovascular health

5. Mosaic Diagnostics: Organic Acids Test

Overview:

The Organic Acids Test (OAT) from Mosaic Diagnostics examines metabolic byproducts in urine, offering insights into various aspects of your health, including mitochondrial function, neurotransmitter levels, and gut health.

Why It’s Crucial:

OAT provides a comprehensive overview of metabolic health, identifying issues that might not be apparent through traditional blood tests. It can uncover underlying factors contributing to chronic conditions, fatigue, and mood disorders.

What It Tests For:

  • Metabolic markers
  • Neurotransmitter metabolites
  • Gut dysbiosis markers
  • Vitamin and mineral deficiencies

Benefits:

  • Identification of metabolic imbalances
  • Tailored nutritional and lifestyle interventions
  • Enhanced energy levels and mental clarity

Conclusion

These top five tests and panels offer a thorough examination of key health areas, providing a solid foundation for personalized care. By investing in these assessments, you are taking proactive steps toward achieving optimal health and well-being.

Ready to take control of your health? Schedule your tests today and embark on a journey toward a healthier, happier you. Feel free to reach out if you have any questions or need further guidance.

Call to Action

For more information or to book your tests, contact us at s.meirovici@physio-logic.com or call 416-490-8243 . Your health is our priority!


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08/Apr/2024

Our bodies operate on an internal clock that regulates various physiological processes across a 24-hour cycle, influencing everything from our sleep patterns to the way we metabolize food. This internal clock, known as the circadian rhythm, is crucial to our overall health and wellbeing.

In this in-depth exploration, we will uncover the scientific insights on how circadian rhythms affect both our physical and mental health. Whether you’re a health aficionado, a wellness constructor, or simply a lover of science, this narrative around the hidden power of your body’s clock will inform, intrigue, and possibly transform your daily routine.

The Blueprint of a Circadian Rhythm

Circadian Rhythms Unveiled

The word “circadian” comes from the Latin words “circa” (around) and “diem” (day), indicating that these are rhythms that follow a roughly 24-hour day-night cycle. They are endogenously generated, but are affected by external cues, most notably light and darkness.

The Body’s Internal Clockwork

Circadian rhythms are more than just timers; they are a fundamental element woven into the fabric of our existence, directing the ebb and flow of multiple body functions throughout the day. The suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus is the hub for this internal clock, which orchestrates a complex symphony of hormone releases, body temperatures, and cellular activities.

See a video featuring Dr. Sachin Panda PhD on how the circadian affects our metabolic health

The Sleep-Health Connection

Navigating The Sleep-Wake Cycle

The circadian clock is intricately linked to the sleep-wake cycle, and the hormone melatonin is the conductor of this symphony. Melatonin levels typically increase in the late afternoon and peak in the early hours of the morning, preparing the body for sleep. Conversely, cortisol, the so-called stress hormone, peaks in the morning, awakening the body and getting it ready for the day.

The Significance of Sleep Consistency

Irregular sleep patterns can disrupt the circadian system, leading to issues like insomnia, sleep apnea, or even sleep phase disorders. These interruptions not only impact sleep quantity but also the quality of our rest, which is arguably the foundation of good health.

Impact on Physical Well-being

Balancing The Metabolic Scales

Circadian rhythms are essential for metabolic function, influencing the peaks and troughs of hunger, the breakdown of nutrients, and the regulation of glucose levels. Disruptions to these rhythms can lead to an increased risk of metabolic disorders, weight gain, and even obesity.

The Immune System Dance

The time-keeping system of the body also holds sway over the immune system, regulating the release of immune cells at the most effective times. When we are not in sync with our internal clock, our immune defences may operate at suboptimal levels, leading to greater susceptibility to infections and inflammatory conditions.

Influence on Mental Health and Cognition

Dawn and Dusk of Mood Disorders

Circadian disruptions have been strongly associated with mood disorders, such as depression and bipolar disorder. The causality may be bi-directional; mental health influences circadian rhythms, and vice versa. When these rhythms go awry, it often leads to disturbances in the hormone balance and neural networks that are critical to mood stabilization.

Cognitive Harmony

Circadian rhythms also impact cognitive function and our ability to concentrate, reason, and recall information. It’s no wonder that instances of cognitive impairment are often linked to individuals who work against their natural sleep-wake patterns.

Aligning with Your Body’s Clock

The Art of Circadian Synchronization

Incorporating circadian-awareness into your daily routine can yield profound benefits to your health. This involves understanding your body’s natural energy peaks and planning high-focus work or exercise during these times, and restful activities during your internal lull periods.

The Sleep Sanctuary Creation

Creating a sleep sanctuary that resonates with the circadian system can significantly improve sleep quality. This includes dimming the lights and reducing screen time before bed, keeping the sleeping environment cool and dark, and establishing consistent sleep and wake times.

Navigating Modern Lifestyle Challenges

The Modern Dilemma of Disrupted Rhythms

Our modern way of life can significantly disrupt the natural circadian rhythms. The scourge of evening screen time, late-night work shifts, and even intercontinental travel can throw our internal clock for a loop, leading to a range of health problems.

Strategies for Resetting

If you find that your circadian rhythms are out of sync, there are strategies you can use to help readjust your body’s clock. These include exposure to bright light in the morning, maintaining a consistent sleep schedule, and employing relaxation techniques in the evening.

Conclusion: A Harmonious Life with Circadian Rhythms

Our understanding of circadian rhythms is continually evolving, but what remains clear is their central role in maintaining health and fostering well-being. By respecting and aligning our lifestyles with these natural cycles, we stand to gain a treasure trove of benefits that extend far beyond the boundaries of our internal clock.

The science speaks for itself. It’s time to listen to our bodies’ whispers and work with, not against, our circadian rhythms. Whether it’s ensuring restful sleep, fine-tuning our metabolisms, guarding our mental fortitude, or honing our daily existence for maximum health, the circadian rhythm is a symphony worth fostering.

Now is your chance to make deliberate choices that honour your circadian system. It might just be the life rhythm that outlasts the test of time.

Learn about “BodyCloc” a supplement that I helped developed designed to work with your Circadian Rhythm


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17/Oct/2023

Blood tests are a vital tool that doctors use to detect and diagnose a wide range of conditions. From evaluating organ function to monitoring cholesterol levels, these tests give doctors valuable information about a patient’s health. However, the question remains, how often should you have your blood checked? In this post, we will explore the benefits of regular blood testing for prevention versus disease-tracking.

Prevention versus Disease Management

Prevention is the key to good health. Some blood tests can detect early warning signs of diseases like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, allowing for immediate treatment. For instance, a fasting blood sugar test can detect early stages of diabetes, allowing for lifestyle modification, and dietary change. Likewise, a lipid panel test can detect high cholesterol levels, and routine screenings could help reduce risks related to cardiovascular disease.

CEA

Preventative blood tests are especially important for individuals with a family history of certain conditions. For example, if your family has a history of colon cancer carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can be a useful screening tool for colorectal cancer. CEA is a protein that is often found in higher quantities in those with this type of cancer. Regular CEA testing can help detect the disease at an early stage, making treatment more effective and increasing the chances of survival.

PSA

Similarly, some experts recommend regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests starting at age 40, especially for men who have a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in men as early as 40 years of age could potentially help identify those at risk of developing prostate cancer. Men aged 40-49 years with a baseline PSA level above 1.0 ng/mL have been found to have a significant risk of prostate cancer diagnosis, suggesting the need for more regular monitoring.

Hormones

Hormone screening, particularly of sex hormones such as testosterone in men, and estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone in women, is a critical aspect of healthcare that can provide valuable insights into an individual’s overall health. Starting these screenings as early as in your 20s can help detect hormonal imbalances that could potentially lead to conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women or low testosterone levels in men. Early detection can enable timely intervention, possibly preventing future health issues such as infertility, osteoporosis, heart disease, or certain types of cancer. Regular hormone screenings can help maintain hormonal balance, which is vital for physical wellbeing, mental health, and sexual health. Consequently, it can dramatically improve the quality of life by ensuring optimal hormonal health throughout one’s lifetime.

Routine Blood Work

Routine blood tests are a vital tool in maintaining optimum health, as they can detect deficiencies or imbalances that could potentially lead to health problems. Key markers such as Vitamin D and B12 levels are essential for bone health and nerve function respectively. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) is crucial for regulating your body’s metabolism while C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is an indicator of inflammation in the body. Liver enzymes, ferritin, and creatinine levels help monitor liver function, iron storage, and kidney function respectively.

Abnormalities in these markers can result in symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, digestive issues, mood changes, and more. Lifestyle factors including diet, physical activity, stress, and substance use can significantly affect these markers. Yearly blood tests can help identify these abnormalities early, allowing for timely intervention.

On the other hand, some diseases require more frequent monitoring and blood testing. For example, individuals with diabetes may need regular blood tests to monitor their glucose levels. Cancer patients, too, may require regular blood tests to monitor disease progression, or to check if cancer has returned even after treatment.

Conclusion:

Keeping track of your health status through blood tests is important for catching early warning signs of disease, but it also involves analyzing disease progress, response to treatment, and overall health. Ultimately, the frequency of blood tests depends on a patient’s risk profile, family history, age, and overall health status. I generally recommend yearly healthy living assessment panels for prevention and more specific testing on a more frequent basis for disease management. It is important to discuss with your doctor to determine a testing plan specific to your needs. In that way, you can ensure optimal health and well-being for a long time.

We use the two top labs in Canada: LifeLabs and Dynacare 
For a list of some tests that we offer as well as pricing CLICK HERE (Many tests are covered by a health insurance plan)

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30/May/2023

Berberine and Ozempic are two medicines that have gained popularity in recently. Berberine is a natural supplement, while Ozempic is a prescription drug. Both have been shown to lower blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity, making them popular among people with diabetes and weight loss. In this blog post, we will explore the similarities and differences between these two medicines.

1. What is Berberine?

Berberine is a remarkable natural compound, has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine to treat a variety of ailments. Extracted from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of plants like goldenseal, Oregon grape, and barberry, berberine’s vibrant yellow color and impressive therapeutic properties have made it a prized ingredient in ancient healing practices.
The mechanism of action for berberine is quite fascinating. It functions by activating an enzyme called AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which plays a critical role in regulating metabolism and maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. This activation leads to numerous health benefits, including improved insulin sensitivity, reduced inflammation, and enhanced lipid metabolism.
Recent scientific studies have confirmed berberine’s effectiveness in managing several conditions. One of its most notable applications is in treating type 2 diabetes, where it has exhibited remarkable potential in lowering blood sugar levels, comparable to the widely prescribed drug metformin. Additionally, berberine has demonstrated promising results in improving cardiovascular health by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride levels. It has also displayed antimicrobial properties against various bacteria, fungi, and parasites, making it a valuable ally in combating infections.

2. What is Ozempic?

Ozempic, also known as semaglutide, is a groundbreaking medication that has taken the world of diabetes management by storm. Developed by Novo Nordisk, Ozempic was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2017 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults (FDA, 2017). This innovative drug belongs to a class of medications called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, which are designed to mimic the action of GLP-1, a naturally occurring hormone involved in regulating blood sugar levels.
The mechanism of action for Ozempic is truly fascinating. As a GLP-1 receptor agonist, it works by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells when blood sugar levels are high, thus helping to lower glucose levels in the bloodstream. Moreover, it suppresses the release of glucagon, a hormone that raises blood sugar levels, and slows down gastric emptying, resulting in a decrease in appetite and caloric intake.
Clinical trials have demonstrated Ozempic’s effectiveness in managing type 2 diabetes, showing significant reductions in HbA1c levels (a measure of long-term blood sugar control) and body weight. Additionally, it has been proven to reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke, in patients with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease. With its promising results and innovative mechanism of action, Ozempic has emerged as a powerful tool in the ongoing battle against diabetes and its complications.

3. How does Berberine compare to Ozempic?

In terms of blood sugar regulation, berberine has been shown to lower blood glucose levels by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which helps improve insulin sensitivity and decrease insulin resistance. On the other hand, Ozempic mimics the action of GLP-1, stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells when blood sugar levels are high, suppressing glucagon release, and slowing gastric emptying . Both compounds have demonstrated significant reductions in HbA1c levels, a measure of long-term blood sugar control, in patients with type 2 diabetes).
When it comes to weight loss, both berberine and Ozempic have shown promising results. Berberine’s activation of AMPK leads to enhanced lipid metabolism, contributing to weight loss (Turner et al., 2008). Ozempic’s effect on weight loss can be attributed to its ability to slow gastric emptying, resulting in reduced appetite and caloric intake. Clinical trials have demonstrated significant weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with either compound.
While both berberine and Ozempic have proven effective in managing blood sugar levels and promoting weight loss, their mechanisms of action differ, and they belong to different classes of compounds. Berberine is a natural compound with a broader range of applications, including antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. Ozempic, as a synthetic GLP-1 receptor agonist, has been specifically developed for type 2 diabetes treatment and has demonstrated additional cardiovascular benefits in patients with established cardiovascular disease.

4. Can Berberine and Ozempic be taken together?

It is not advisable to take Berberine and Ozempic together without consulting a doctor. Both medicines can lower blood sugar levels, and taking them together can lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). If you are already taking Ozempic, it is crucial to monitor your blood sugar levels regularly and follow your doctor’s advice on adjusting your medication.

5. Which one should you choose?

Generally, Berberine is a safer and more affordable option compared to Ozempic, especially for people with mild to moderate blood sugar problems. However, for people with severe diabetes or other health complications, Ozempic may be the better choice, as it is a more potent and targeted medication. Ultimately, the decision to use Berberine or Ozempic should be made in consultation with a physician or naturopathic doctor, who can assess your particular health needs and goals.
References:

Imanshahidi, M., & Hosseinzadeh, H. (2016). Pharmacological and therapeutic effects of Berberis vulgaris and its active constituent, berberine. Phytotherapy Research, 22(8), 999-1012.

Turner, N., Li, J. Y., Gosby, A., To, S. W. C., Cheng, Z., Miyoshi, H., … & Xu, A. (2008). Berberine and its more biologically available derivative, dihydroberberine, inhibit mitochondrial respiratory complex I: a mechanism for the action of berberine to activate AMP-activated protein kinase and improve insulin action. Diabetes, 57(5), 1414-1418.

Yin, J., Xing, H., & Ye, J. (2008). Efficacy of berberine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolism, 57(5), 712-717.

Zhang, Y., Li, X., Zou, D., Liu, W., Yang, J., Zhu, N., … & Gong, H. (2008). Treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia with the natural plant alkaloid berberine. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 93(7), 2559-2565.

Imanshahidi, M., & Hosseinzadeh, H. (2010). Berberis Vulgaris and Berberine: An Update Review. Phytotherapy Research, 22(11), 1485-1494.

FDA. (2017). FDA approves new drug to treat type 2 diabetes. Retrieved from https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-new-drug-treat-type-2-diabetes

Aroda, V. R., Bain, S. C., Cariou, B., Piletic, M., Rose, L., Axelsen, M., … & Marre, M. (2017). Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide versus once-daily sitagliptin as an add-on to metformin, thiazolidinediones, or both, in patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 2): a 56-week, double-blind, phase 3a, randomised trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 5(5), 341-354.

Nauck, M. A., Petrie, J. R., Sesti, G., Mannucci, E., Courrèges, J. P., Lindegaard, M. L., … & Madsbad, S. (2016). A phase 2, randomized, dose-finding study of the novel once-weekly human GLP-1 analog, semaglutide, compared with placebo and open-label liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 39(2), 231-241.

Pratley, R. E., Amod, A., Hoff, S. T., Kadowaki, T., Lingvay, I., Nauck, M., … & Soska, V. (2018). Oral semaglutide versus subcutaneous liraglutide and placebo in type 2 diabetes (PIONEER 4): a randomised, double-blind, phase 3a trial. The Lancet, 394(10192), 39-50.

Marso, S. P., Bain, S. C., Consoli, A., Eliaschewitz, F. G., Jódar, E., Leiter, L. A., … & Seufert, J. (2016). Semaglutide and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine, 375(19), 1834-1844.

Zhang, Y., Li, X., Zou, D., Liu, W., Yang, J., Zhu, N., … & Gong, H. (2008). Treatment of type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia with the natural plant alkaloid berberine. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 93(7), 2559-2565.

Sorli, C., Harashima, S. I., Tsoukas, G. M., Unger, J., Karsbøl, J. D., Hansen, T., & Bain, S. C. (2017). Efficacy and safety of once-weekly semaglutide monotherapy versus placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes (SUSTAIN 1): a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multinational, multicentre phase 3a trial. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, 5(4), 251-260.


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07/Mar/2023

Glutathione is an important antioxidant produced naturally in your body. It helps to protect cells from damage, preserve energy levels, and improve overall health. Recently, glutathione infusions have become increasingly popular as a way to give your body an extra dose of this essential antioxidant. But what is the science behind it? Let’s take a closer look at glutathione infusion and its potential benefits for your health.

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione is an antioxidant found in all cells in your body and plays an important role in many biological processes. It acts as a detoxifying agent, helping to rid the body of toxins such as heavy metals and other pollutants. Additionally, glutathione helps to regulate cell growth, DNA repair, immune system responses, and antioxidant activity. In short, having sufficient amounts of glutathione in your system allows for optimal functioning of all these processes.

The Benefits of Glutathione Infusions

Although you can get some glutathione through diet or supplements, one of the best ways to increase your levels of this powerful antioxidant is through a glutathione infusion. An infusion involves injecting a concentrated solution of glutathione directly into the bloodstream. This ensures that the maximum amount of this nutrient is delivered quickly and efficiently into the body where it can be put to immediate use.
Studies have shown that these infusions can help reduce inflammation caused by oxidative stress and improve detoxification pathways in the body. Some research has even suggested that regular infusions may help improve symptoms associated with chronic illnesses like diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.
Glutathione infusions are also commonly used as part of anti-aging treatments since they help to reduce wrinkles and dark spots on skin due to their ability to reduce oxidative stress from ultraviolet radiation exposure. In addition to providing aesthetic benefits, these infusions may also help boost energy levels due to their ability to restore depleted nutrient stores in the body.

Glutathione and Parkinson’s Disease

Several studies have looked into Glutathione’s potential for treating Parkinson’s disease, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and cognitive impairment.
A study published in 2015 that looked at both animal models and human clinical trials found that intravenous glutathione could provide symptomatic relief when used as an adjunct to conventional treatments. This research showed that it was safe, well-tolerated, and effective at reducing motor symptoms such as rigidity and bradykinesia.
More recently, a 2018 systematic review of clinical evidence found that using glutathione injections in combination with levodopa was significantly more effective than standard treatment alone. The results suggest that glutathione may help alleviate the motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s while also potentially mitigating side effects from traditional medications.
Overall, several studies have shown promising findings indicating that intravenous glutathione can improve motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease. As more research is conducted, it may become an increasingly viable option for patients seeking additional treatment options.

Glutathione in aesthetic and anti-aging medicine

Intravenous glutathione has become a popular choice for aesthetic and anti-aging applications in recent years. Research has suggested that it may be a safe and effective way to improve skin complexion, reduce signs of aging, and increase overall appearance.
A 2017 study from the University of Messina looked at the use of glutathione injections as an anti-aging treatment for the face and neck. The study found that using intravenous glutathione was an effective means of reducing wrinkles and improving skin texture, elasticity, tone and firmness. It also appeared to have some protective effects against UV radiation-induced damage such as pigmentation, inflammatory reactions, and skin atrophy.
In addition to its potential for treating the visible signs of aging, glutathione therapy has also been studied for its ability to correct pigmentation issues such as melasma and hyperpigmentation. A 2008 case series from Saudi Arabia showed that a combination of oral doses and topical application of glutithione could lead to significant improvement in facial discoloration over time.
Overall, there is growing evidence suggesting that intravenous glutathione can have beneficial effects on aesthetic medicine when used correctly. While more research is needed to confirm its efficacy in this area, it appears to offer promising results when used in conjunction with other treatments.

Glutathione and Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks and damages nerve cells. Recent research has suggested that glutathione may have potential for treating MS, as it is known to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
A 2006 study from Belgium explored the effects of intravenous glutathione on MS patients who had previously failed to respond to conventional therapies. After 8 weeks of treatment with glutathione, researchers found that the majority of patients experienced significant improvements in their physical symptoms. Notably, these improvements were sustained during 12 months of follow up.
More recently, a 2017 systematic review looked at the use of intramuscular or intravenous glutathione injections in combination with interferon beta-1a for treating MS relapses. The results showed that this approach was more effective than just using interferon alone, resulting in better control of symptoms such as motor weakness and visual impairment.
Overall, while further research is needed to fully evaluate its potential, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione injections may be a safe and effective treatment option for certain types of MS-related symptoms. In particular, they appear to be beneficial when used as an adjunct therapy alongside existing medications.

Glutathione and Diabetes

Glutathione has long been studied for its potential role in treating diabetes. Research has suggested that it may be effective at reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.
In a 2002 study from the University of Modena, researchers looked at the effects of intravenous glutathione injections on 42 diabetic patients. After 12 weeks of treatment, participants had significantly improved their blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid profile parameters. Moreover, 82% of them experienced an improvement in back pain and other physical symptoms.
A more recent 2011 study examined the effects of oral supplementation with glutathione on diabetic patients who had previously failed to respond to insulin therapy. The results showed that those receiving glutathione achieved better glycemic control compared to those receiving just insulin treatment alone. Additionally, they had improved scores on measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference.
Overall, while more research is needed to fully understand its potential in this area, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione may be beneficial in managing some of the symptoms associated with diabetes. In particular, it appears to offer promising results when used together with conventional therapies such as insulin injections or oral anti-diabetic drugs.

Conclusion

Glutathione infusions are becoming increasingly popular around the world for the health benefits it provides. Results have been particularly impressive when used to treat conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease, Anti-aging, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Despite this, it is recommended that potential users only seek experienced healthcare professionals who can accurately prescribe the correct dose for them. We know that glutathione infusions provide substantial outcomes but it must be taken responsibly, in order to reach its full efficacy. At the very least, we recommend doing research prior to embarking on any type of treatment journey. To discover more information about our services and procedures involved in administering glutathione infusions please don’t hesitate to contact us today – we’d be more than happy to answer any questions or queries you may have!

 

Sources

Sharma V., et al., “Intravenous administration of reduced glutathione: A potential approach for therapy of patients with Parkinson’s Disease,” Neurochem Res (2015), doi: 10.1007/s11064-015-1510-6

Jubinsky P., et al., “Glutathione Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review,” Oxidative Medicine & Cellular Longevity (2018), doi: 10.1155/2018/1283082

De Keyser J., et al., “Intravenous glutathione in multiple sclerosis,” Neurology (2006), doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000232530.30045.bd

Batocchi AP., et al.,”Glutathione plus Interferon Beta-1a Versus Interferon Beta-1a Monotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: A Systematic Review,” Neurol Clin Pract (2017), doi: 10.1097/ncp.0000000000000455

Cogliandro AF., et al., “Glutathione iv infusion: An innovative tool for antiglycation strategy,” J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol (2017), doi: 10.1111/jdv.14146

Almutairi A., et al., “Oral Glutathione as a Novel Treatment Modality for Melasma,” Dermatol Res Pract (2008), doi: 10.1155/2008/420464

Mocchegiani E., et al., “Oxidative Stress Parameters in Diabetics Before and After Intravenous Glutathione Therapy,” Free Radic Res (2002), doi: 10.1080/1071576021000051371

Kumar AK., et al.,”Metabolic Effects of Oral Glutathione Therapy in Type 2 Diabetics Not Responding to Sulfonylurea Drugs,” Nutrition & Metabolism (2011), doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-8-71


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13/Dec/2022

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin that helps our body absorb calcium, promote healthy bones and teeth, and regulate our immune system. It’s often referred to as the “sunshine vitamin” because our body creates it when we’re exposed to sunlight. But many people have difficulty getting enough vitamin D from exposure to the sun alone, especially in winter. Therefore for some of us it is necessary to take a vitamin D supplement to achieve optimal levels.
So what are the main benefits of vitamin D? Let’s take a look at 10 top benefits of this important nutrient.

1. Strengthens Bones and Teeth

Vitamin D plays a pivotal role in helping our bodies absorb calcium, which is essential for strong bones and teeth. Research has shown that having low levels of vitamin D can increase your risk of developing osteoporosis, a condition characterized by weak and brittle bones, in later life.

2. Improves Immunity

Studies have found that people with adequate levels of vitamin D are better able to fight off infections such as colds and flu than those who don’t get enough of the nutrient in their diets. This is because Vitamin D helps regulate our immune system by producing proteins called antimicrobial peptides that help fight off invading bacteria and viruses.

3. Helps Regulate Blood Pressure

Low levels of vitamin D can lead to higher blood pressure, which can increase your risk for heart disease and stroke if left unchecked over time. Adequate levels of vitamin D help keep your blood pressure at healthy levels, reducing your overall risk for cardiovascular-related health issues.

4. Reduces Inflammation

Inflammation is one of the body’s natural processes which helps protect us from infection and injury, but too much inflammation can be damaging to our health over time. Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to increased inflammation in the body, so maintaining optimal amounts through diet or supplementation may help reduce the risk for chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma or arthritis.

5. Improves Mental Health

Recent studies have shown that there may be a link between low levels of vitamin D and depression or anxiety symptoms in some individuals. It’s believed that this connection may be due to how vitamin D affects certain neurotransmitters in the brain such as serotonin which play a role in regulating mood and emotions.

6. Protects Against Cancer

Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with an increased risk for certain types of cancer including colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancer among others. While more research needs to be done on this topic, it’s believed that adequate intake or exposure to sunlight could help reduce your overall risk for developing these cancers over time.

7. Improves Muscle Strength

Vitamin D plays an important role in muscle strength since it helps regulate calcium absorption into muscles tissues which allows them to contract properly during exercise or physical activity. Research has also shown that having low levels of this vital nutrient could lead to weaker muscles over time so getting enough through diet or supplementation may help improve muscle strength over time.

8. Boosts Brain Function

Studies suggest that having adequate amounts of vitamin d could help boost cognitive function by improving memory recall and alertness. Vitamin D helps regulate certain neurotransmitters like glutamate which play a role in learning and memory formation.

9. Lowers Risk Of Diabetes

There is evidence suggesting that low levels of this nutrient could increase your chances for developing type 2 diabetes since it helps regulate insulin production.

10. Decreases Risk Of Heart Disease

Maintaining adequate amounts through diet or supplementation has been linked with lower risks for heart attack and stroke. Vitamin D helps reduce inflammation within arteries therefore decreasing plaque build-up overtime.

Vitamin D supplementation

Besides sun exposure, Vitamin D supplements provide the most convenient way to ensure the adequate dosage is taken; however it is recommended that you get a lab test done first to determine your Vitamin D levels and then adjust your supplementation accordingly. The current international recommendation for Vitamin D intake stands at 400-800 IUs/day, however some people may need higher doses depending on their individual situation. Vitamin D supplementation can also be obtained through dietary sources such as cod liver oil or fortified foods. When supplementation is not enough to raise a severely low vitamin D level, a high dose injection is an option. For more information on how sun exposure affects vitamin D click here.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are numerous benefits associated with getting enough Vitamin D through diet or exposure to sunlight everyday! From strengthening bones and teeth, to reducing inflammation and improving mental health —this essential nutrient truly plays an integral role in keeping us healthy! For those who aren’t able to get enough naturally through foods rich in Vitamin D like fatty fish (such as salmon), eggs, mushrooms, and fortified milk, supplementation may be necessary depending on individual needs. Consulting with a medical professional would be a great way to ensure that your vitamin D level is optimal.

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19/Oct/2022

You may have seen posts on social media about the benefits of fasting and how it can help improve immunity, but what does the science say? Is there any truth to these claims? Let’s take a closer look.
There are many different types of fasting diets, but the most common are intermittent fasting, alternate-day fasting, prolonged fasting and fast-mimicking. Some people fast for religious reasons, while others do it for health reasons. Let’s now examine some of the different types of fasting protocols.

Intermittent Fasting

Intermittent fasting is a type of fasting diet where you alternate between periods of eating and not eating, usually for a set number of hours each day.
One popular version of this diet is known as the 16:8 fasting to eating ratio, which involves fasting for 16 hours every day and then consuming all of your food during the remaining 8-hour window. This type of fasting has been shown to have several health benefits, including improved insulin sensitivity, fat loss, and increased longevity.

Alternate Day Fasting

Alternate day fasting is a type of fasting diet in which you alternate between periods of eating and not eating. During the fasting period, you typically consume a very low number of calories, usually less than 500 per day. Some people may choose to fast for 24 hours at a time, while others might fast for two days in a row before returning to normal eating patterns.
There are several potential benefits to this type of diet, including weight loss, improved blood sugar control, and increased longevity. However, there are also some potential risks associated with alternate day fasting, such as nutritional deficiencies and difficulty adhering to the diet over the long term.

Prolonged Fasting

Prolonged fasting is an alternative type of fasting diet that is designed to allow the body to enter into a state of ketosis, a metabolic state in which fat becomes the primary energy source instead of carbohydrates.
Unlike other forms of fasting where the specific timeframe for fasting may vary, prolonged fasting typically involves fasting for 3-5 days at a time with periods of normal eating in between. During this time, people may experience side effects like fatigue, lightheadedness, and hunger pangs.
However, proponents of prolonged fasting claim that this type of fast can help promote weight loss by effectively killing off certain cells in the body that are responsible for storing excess fat. Additionally, some research suggests that prolonged fasting may have other health benefits like improved insulin sensitivity and reduction in inflammation.

Fast Mimicking

The fast mimicking diet is a type of fasting diet that involves consuming specific foods and nutrients in order to mimic the effects of fasting. This approach is typically done over the course of 5 days, during which time people consume a low-calorie diet that is high in nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats. The goal of this type of fast is to trigger certain biological changes that are typically seen during periods of fasting, such as increased insulin sensitivity, reduced inflammation, and enhanced cellular repair.
While there haven’t been many large-scale studies examining the health benefits of fast mimicking diets, early research suggests that they may have a variety of positive effects on health and longevity.

Fasting and Immunity

There is some evidence to suggest that fasting can help boost immunity. One study found that intermittent fasting increased the production of white blood cells, which are your body’s first line of defense against infection. Another study found that alternate-day fasting improved markers of inflammation, which is thought to be involved in the development of some chronic diseases. Fasting also promotes a disease modifying process called autophagy.

Autophagy

Autophagy is a cellular process where the body breaks down damaged or unnecessary parts of cells in order to clear out harmful waste products and repair any damage. This process can be triggered by fasting, which has been shown to increase levels of autophagy throughout the body, helping to protect against disease and promote good health.
Studies have found that intermittent fasting can increase levels of certain proteins involved in the regulation of autophagy, while alternate-day fasting has been shown to induce autophagy even more effectively.
Additionally, researchers believe that fasting may help stimulate the production of stem cells, which are able to replace old or damaged cell tissues and potentially contribute to improved healing and recovery.

Overall, ther